Tag Archives: kidblog

G the Kid Scientist

I’ve been watching Cosmos with the kids every Tuesday because it’s on past bedtimes on Sundays and we can all watch it together after school using the “on demand” replay. They all look forward to it and it leads to some great discussion. After the first show, G, age 5, declared she wanted to be a “kid scientist.” During our next trip to the library, she picked out books on space and the human body, but really, space is winning out. She told me she wanted to do experiments, so on the next trip to the library, we took out Astronomy for Every Kid: 101 Easy Experiments That Really Work, by Janice VanCleave. Now I will admit I think many of the experiments are a stretch, and many aren’t even experiments in the true sense of the word, BUT G picked out a few to try and she is pleased about feeling like a kid scientist.

experimenting

Here she is seeing how water affects the weight of a rock…which is supposed to relate to the moon’s gravity versus earth’s…which is kind of a stretch. But what’s more interesting is what the kid scientist did next. She told me she had her own “experiment” to do, and she requested a piece of black paper and two balloons. I blew up the balloons and she covered one with brown marks representing craters. Then she made silver marks all over the piece of black poster board I found. Then she set it all up.

earth moon sun model

The sun is in the center, obviously. She had me walk the globe pillow (representing earth, of course) around the sun, while she walked with me, moving her moon balloon (the one with the craters–impossible to see in this action shot) around the earth.

And this is why I love tagging along behind kids following their own interests. If I’d decided it was time to do an “astronomy unit” and had her create a model of the solar system, really, I’d have no idea if she was getting it. But a child who asks for materials to complete a vision in her head that demonstrates the motion of the earth around the sun, and the moon around the earth? That kid understands what she’s doing. It’s so darn cool, every single time.

Puppets in the Style of Paul Klee

Puppets in the Style of Paul Klee at amyhoodarts.com

Materials: Sculpey or air-dry clay; paint; yarn/other scrap materials for decorations; fabric for body; glue

Not long ago, we read quite a bit about artist Paul Klee. I considered him for the featured artist for Art Together: Printmaking (I went with Hokusai), but in the meantime, we really enjoyed learning more about him. Of course, as we read about some of his techniques, my kids said, “Can we try that?” This is one of the can-we-try-that projects, completed by me and my 5yo daughter.

In Paul Klee for Children by Silke Vry, we learned that Klee created puppets for his young son, and we saw a picture of them. This set on Flickr has images of them, and there is a book about them as well. (We didn’t read that book, but the cover shot is a photo of the puppets.) The Vry book contains Klee-related activities at the back–the sort that leave the product wide open. (That is the sort I like!) It suggested using clay for the puppet heads. We have both air-dry clay and Sculpey, but the latter was much easier for 5yo hands to mold, so we used that.

Child's puppet in the style of Paul Klee at amyhoodarts.com

G’s puppet.

Mold the heads so that your finger fits inside the neck–this is how you’ll control your puppet. After molding the heads, we cooked them according to directions (I burned my puppet’s nose and chin!), then painted on their features using liquid acrylic paint. We attached yarn hair using craft glue–G wanted beads in her puppet’s hair–and then sewed their clothes. The shirt/dress is a simple template–make sure the top opening is big enough to fit over your puppet’s neck, and keep the neck hole and the bottom open. Finally, we used craft glue to attach the neck opening of the shirt/dress to the neck of the puppet.

Adult's puppet in the style of Paul Klee at amyhoodarts.com

My puppet.

The ribbons are there to cover up the join between the cloth and the head and because, as G says, “They’re so pretty.” We are rather chuffed with our puppets.

Child-Led First Hand-Sewing Project

Child-led first hand-sewing project at amyhoodarts.com

This looks like it was planned by a 5yo because it was.

One afternoon while I was working (publishing that zine from my dining room table, like you do), my daughter got out her fabric scraps box and got to work. She’s had her own pair of fabric scissors since she was two, and I’m quite comfortable by this point letting her use them without hovering over her the whole time. So she sat at coffee table nearby, and I sat at the dining room table, and we worked.

When she was finished, she showed me what she’d done. She’d cut out pieces to make a “Super G—,” complete with a drawn-on smiley face and a “G” on the felt body. She’d pinned the head, arms, and legs to the body piece. It just needed to be sewn, and I helped her a bit with that part, as this was her first time using thread. (She embroidered her initial not too long ago.)

She is so happy with this creation. And I adore it, not that it matters if I do or not. But what I adore about it is that it contains so much of her. It shares the style of her drawings and her paper collages. She sat down with fabric and scissors, cut out pieces, no-one hovering to tell her how Things Ought to Be when it comes to sewing. Of course the edges will fray. Of course all the knots are visible on the back. These refinements will come in time, if she continues to be interested in sewing. The most important thing right now, though, is her passion–that, and her utter delight in her finished work.

Ready For Arts Night

(Megan at Days With the Grays has started a great series of interviews with creative mothers. You can catch her interview with me right here.)

My oldest’s child’s school is having their Arts Night tonight, with a performing arts/music component and a display of visual art. He chose to be part of the tech crew for the play. The art teacher kindly invited my non-schooled children to display some of their art as well. The art program at this school is, well, challenged. The teacher is only part-time. I believe he’s not even half-time; I think it’s a .4 position. From my point of view as a parent, art has not been a priority at the school as far as resources, space, or time. This makes me very sad, of course. This also explains why my oldest son chose something from home to display; he wasn’t sure there would be anything from his art class at school. I don’t blame the art teacher for this. I think it must be very challenging to try to run an art program under such limitations. At any rate, I think it was really nice of him to invite my younger kids to participate in the show as well.

My 5yo sorted through all the artwork we’ve done recently (printmaking tends to create lots and lots of finished works!) to try to narrow it down. The best she could do was limit herself to three. She chose three gelatin plate prints:

“Spring Tree” by G, age 5. Gelatin plate print.

“Seaweed in the Ocean” by G, age 5. Gelatin plate print.

“Grassy Chick,” by G, age 5. Gelatin plate print.

My 9yo had a specific idea in mind and set out to create it. After much problem-solving, he was still unable to manipulate the gelatin plate layers quite the way he wanted, so he decided to add the final layer, the tree, by making a second print and using collage.

“Starry Night With Tree” by N, age 9. Gelatin plate print collage.

My 12yo chose one of his gelatin plate prints as well.

“Untitled,” by V, age 12. Gelatin plate print.

The adults in the school community were also invited to participate. I wasn’t sure about this; I didn’t want to be the only adult. But I checked, and there will be others, so I decided I’d show a couple of things too, both linocut prints.

amyhoodarts.com

“Rock Crab,” linocut print.

amyhoodarts.com

“Tulips,” linocut print with watercolor

It’s really nice that all three kids are included and excited. (Can I say it? It’s also nice to be done with play practices…)

In Support of Printmaking

Issue 3 button

My kids and I have been having fun with printmaking for a long while now, so I rounded up some older posts with various printmaking activities that could be used to complement those in Art Together Issue Three: Printmaking. First, though, I wanted to make sure to let you know that Jen is giving away a copy this week; she also shares her and her daughter’s experiences as they begin to explore the issue. I also have a guest post at FIMBY, for which I’m really grateful. Renee is wonderful to work with.

Paint Prints: This post from three years ago (!) demonstrates a version of monoprinting using an acrylic box frame and tempera paint. (My daughter was two. Goodness.)

Labeling the Studio: The kids and I used a slide-decal process–making our own using contact paper–to label all those glass jars we use to store pencils, markers, and so on. The directions are found in the book Print Workshop, which I also list in the resources for Issue Three.

Making Prints While the Sun Shines: Sun paper is an easy and striking way to experiment with making prints. (I like to use the prints in collages, too.)

Craft Foam Printmaking: I led this activity with a group of preschoolers in our co-op last year, and the results were fantastic. It’s a form of collagraph, which is one of the activities in Issue Three, except all the pieces are of craft foam.

How To: Freezer Paper Stencils describes the process of making your own stencil for a shirt or bag, and this post from almost three years ago shows how my boys used the process to design and create their own t-shirts.

Another practical application of printmaking: my daughter created her own cards to sell in order to raise money to give a goal through Heifer International.

A couple of months ago I described how I created the title for Issue Three.

And finally, last week I posted a tutorial on a way to use the gelatin plate to mimic intaglio printmaking methods.

Tutorial: Offset Printing With A Gelatin Plate

Offset Printing Using a Gelatin Plate at amyhoodarts.com

I’ve been head down into printmaking lately, even more than usual, as I researched and prepared Art Together Issue Three: Printmaking. At the beginning of this issue, I define the categories of printmaking, and every category includes at least one version that is possible to do at home, without a printing press…except for intaglio printing. In this type of printmaking, grooves are carved into a plate, which is usually metal, through any number of methods. The plate is inked and then wiped clean, so the ink only remains in the grooves. Paper is dampened, placed on the plate, and the whole shebang is run through a printing press, so that the heavy pressure pushes the paper into the grooves, resulting in the print. It’s just not possible to create enough pressure to do that without a press.

However, the process I describe here, which I read about in Making Monotypes Using a Gelatin Plate, by Nancy Marculewicz (sadly, out of print), mimics the effect of intaglio, taking advantage of the give that a gelatin plate provides–the surface is soft enough to be imprinted. I didn’t include this method in the zine; it’s a little more complex than the free-form experimentation with the gelatin plate that works so well with children and beginners (and truthfully, never gets old), and it uses a Very Sharp Tool. But I do want to share it for those of you who fall in love with gelatin plate printmaking and want to take it further.

Materials: Thin Plexiglas sheet (I found mine in the art store with the drafting/engineering type supplies); scribe or something similarly sharp; block-printing ink and palette of some sort; brayer; baren; gelatin plate (instructions for making one can be found in Art Together Issue Three)

Process: First, you need a line drawing that you want to work with and that fits the size of your gelatin plate. I did this twice. The first drawing is at the top of this post; the tutorial was made using the second drawing. When you have a drawing you’re happy with, tape it to your surface and then tape your thin Plexiglas sheet on top. You want to try to minimize slippage.

ready to trace

Now you’re going to use your scribe to scratch into the surface along the lines. You’re aiming to throw up a burr on each side of your scratch, so it holds the ink.

Inscribing into the plastic plate.

Apologies for the glare…overhead lighting in the studio.

You can lift up the plastic to check your progress. This isn’t easy work; you don’t want to scratch right through the plastic, but you do want the grooves deep enough to hold the ink. (You may find, after going through the entire process and taking a print, that you want to deepen your grooves and try again.)

When the etching is complete, ink up your plastic plate using block-printing ink and a brayer (again, if you’re unsure how to do this, you can check out Issue Three). I tried colored ink but found black worked best; however, experiment! Another type of ink, or acrylic paint, may yield completely different results.

inked plate

Make sure you cover the grooved area, but you don’t need to ink up the entire plate. That’s because in the next step, you’re going to wipe away the excess ink. I used an old dish towel for this, one of the really thin ones. Any lint-free cloth will work. I’m thinking old cloth diapers might be perfect.

excess ink wiped

Work quickly, because ink dries fast. See how it’s been caught in the grooves? The next step is to place your etched, inked plate face down onto your gelatin plate and press, to transfer the ink to the gelatin.

impression on gelatin plate

So cool, right? Now lay your paper over your gelatin plate and take a print. Normally with a gelatin plate you don’t need a baren, but for this process, you really kind of do.

finished print 1

It’s really an organic-looking result. Pressing hard enough on the plastic plate to transfer the ink causes some bubbles, which may show up on the finished print. Make sure to take ghost prints, too. (Ghost prints are second prints taken without re-inking the plate.)

Knowing that inked gelatin plates also pick up texture from textured surfaces, such as bubble wrap, that are pressed against them, I wondered if I could use the plastic plate in that way. So I inked up the gelatin plate instead, then pressed the non-inked plastic plate face down onto it. Then I took a print from the gelatin plate. This is the result.

finished print 2

You can really see the bubbles in this version. You can also see that the plastic plate was slightly smaller than the gelatin, because a firm line was created where the edge of the plate plastic into the gelatin. I prefer this version. It’s interesting.

As I said, this is a bit more labor intensive and controlled than the usual methods of using the gelatin plate, which are very loose and “let’s see what happens.” Yet because it uses gelatin, it’s still very organic looking and impossible to completely control. It’s also a way to integrate original drawings into gelatin plate prints.

If you try this method (or have tried it) and have any tips to share, I’d love to hear them. And if you’ve never tried printmaking before, it’s so much fun…and I have an entire issue of Art Together to help you get started.

{Art Together} Issue Three: Printmaking Available Now

I am so VERY excited to announce that the third issue of Art Together is now available. This issue focuses on printmaking, which has long been a fascination for me and my kids. It’s so fun and magical. You can read all about (and purchase) the third issue right here. Some giveaways are planned as well, and I’ll be sure to let you know where to look for them.

I’ve added some of the artwork we created while preparing this issue to the {Art Together} Flickr Group. If you’ve been creating art together with your children, I’d love to have you join and share it in the group.

And as always, questions, comments, and feedback are always welcome: amyhood at amyhoodarts.com.

Making + Listening::5/2014

I’ve been very busy making this past week. First priority was a custom order for Dawn, for a pouch for her son’s Kindle. She also wanted it to be protected against wetness. After talking about her son’s interests, this is the design we came up with.

photo 1 copy

For the uninitiated, that’s a Minecraft cake block.

I lined it with PUL, the fabric that’s used for cloth diapers and wet bags.

photo 2 copy

It’s on its way to Dawn and her son now. I always put my own good intentions into what I make–even when I don’t know who may end up buying something, I make everything as if I’m sewing a gift for a friend. But when I do know who will be getting it, that’s even better, because then I’m thinking of them all the way through. Which is to say, I enjoyed making this for Ander!

Also this week I’ve been working to put together the next issue of Art Together. I am so excited about it. As part of that process, I made my first gelatin printmaking plate.

gelatin plate

Photo by V. Hood.

The kids and I spent Wednesday morning experimenting with it, and we were back at it after lunch on Thursday! I have a stack of gelatin plates in my fridge right now (I cut the large one down into smaller ones). Because this is a completely normal thing for some of us, to have ink-stained printmaking plates hanging out in the fridge.

I’m also happy to be making time for running again. Earlier this month I was cleared by the orthopedist to start slowly, with short distances, adding only 1/2 mile or so of mileage each week. I was waylaid a bit while my husband was away last week, but I got back to the track last night and it felt so good! I’m also transitioning to minimalist shoes, on the orthopedist’s recommendation, which requires a different footstrike, too. (I know, I lost the non-runners there, sorry.) The bright side is that coming back slowly to running makes it the perfect time to transition, because you have to do that slowly too. By the time sunrise is early enough for me to get out before I need to tend to the day (my favorite running time), I ought to be able to just head out the door and go.

As for listening…it’s still the Olympics most of the time, and Pandora shuffle in the art room. What a happy thing, to listen to music and make art.

(Linking up with Dawn again this week.)

Give-away: Home/School/Life Magazine Subscription

Thanks to everyone for your supportive comments, and congratulations to Heather, whose number came up on random.org. She commented, “Our family has been seeking a publication like the one you are creating that delves into all aspects of a homeschooling life. We are excited to have the opportunity to be a part of this enriching, inspiring, supportive community. Thank you for creating this magazine. Yay!”

I was very excited when Shelli announced she’d been asked to be the editor of a new homeschooling magazine, Home/School/Life Magazine. Firstly, because I’ve been reading Shelli for a while and I’m truly happy when good things happen for people I know. (I don’t know if I have just found a good corner of the internet or what, but I know of so many creative, generous, hardworking people putting fantastic things into the world.) Secondly, because I don’t read any homeschooling magazines or websites regularly. I read blogs and connect with other homeschoolers online, but I haven’t subscribed to a homeschool magazine in quite a long time. Shelli’s description of the new magazine sounded like it would fill a niche in my mailbox.

And this was before she asked if I’d be interested in writing an art column…

So yes, I now have a personal interest in the success of this magazine, beyond my desire that it succeed because Shelli is the editor and because it will be really nice to have a homeschooling magazine to read. I was really excited to be asked to be a part of it. (So excited I emailed my husband: “I know you’re on a plane right now and won’t read this for hours, but I can’t wait to tell you this!!”) I admit it’s challenging to write a post about something that isn’t, actually, complete yet. The first issue is due this spring, so I can’t review it yet and tell you it’s awesome. But I can tell you I’ve seen the planned contents, and I’m really, really looking forward to it.

HSL flier jpeg

Besides my column, the magazine will include Shelli’s on hands-on science, a curriculum column, and one on books—in every issue. Other regular features include “One Subject, Four Ways,” “Balancing Act,” (something I think we’re all trying to do), and a profile of a homeschooling family. Each issue will also look at a different career path, and have sections devoted to varying grade levels: early grades, middle grades, and high school. And each issue will also include three feature articles. This is an ambitious, exciting-sounding outline for the sort of magazine I’ve been wishing existed.

Shelli and Amy, the editor-in-chief, have generously offered me the chance to give away a one-year digital subscription to the magazine to one of my readers. If you’re interested, leave a comment telling me why you’re excited for a new homeschooling magazine, and make sure to include your name and email address in the proper boxes. (If you’re chosen, I’ll also need your city/state and/or country, but this giveaway is open to everyone, worldwide.) As for me, I am most excited for the tangible connection to a larger community that I think this magazine will represent.

Comments will be open until next Tuesday, February 25, at 6 pm EST, and I’ll contact the winner (and update this post) on February 26.

Making + Listening::3/2014

Sunday at the grocery store, the kids and I bought flowers. Cheerful flowers are one of the small joys of life, no? We finally settled on delphiniums (blue) and tulips (pink). I decided to use the flowers as a drawing practice subject. I found it was easier, at first, to draw the delphiniums. I suspect this is because I have an idea of what tulips look like, but I’m not familiar with delphiniums. My brain couldn’t try to take over with preconceived ideas, in other words. With the delphiniums, all I could do was look at what was there and draw it.

my sketch-delphiniums at amyhoodarts.com

delphinium sketches

Sigh, it’s so hard to photograph pencil sketches. At any rate, of course I asked the kids if they wanted to draw the flowers too. And they did. My 9yo received a nice set of colored pencils for Christmas, and he uses them every chance he gets (I would too!). So his sketch of the tulips in their vase is in color.

N's drawing of tulips at amyhoodarts.com

G, like me, sketched in pencil.

G's drawing 2 at amyhoodarts.com

delphinium sketches by 5yo

G's drawing at amyhoodarts.com

I gave the tulips another go and quite liked the ones on the right, which I went over in Pitt pen.

my sketch-tulips at amyhoodarts.com

tulip sketches

Rather a long time ago, I decided I wanted to figure out linocuts, but it sort of settled to the bottom of the list. However, we’ve been looking at lots of examples of woodcuts and block prints lately, and I’ve been trying to get a handle on what decisions the artists made, and why. I thought I could try to translate the tulip sketch into a linocut. I worked on the carving a bit at a time over several days, and I’m pleased with the result. This is a test print I just pulled today.

linocut of tulips at amyhoodarts.com

Actually, I’m going to rephrase that. I am not just “pleased” with the results. I’m really, really happy. I look at this and I am proud of it. Pfft on the understatement. I am all WOW! I carved this!!

Creating is just so fabulous.

I’m linking up with Dawn again this week for Making + Listening. As for the listening part, I found some Pete Yorn on my computer and enjoyed listening to that. Otherwise, it was a lot more of the 80s station to get through the work trip, which ended up lasting nearly two weeks thanks to cancellations and delays. He finally got home yesterday, two days late, and we were all so happy to see him.