Tag Archives: kidblog

Printmaking Love: Printing With Kids

printmaking love at amyhoodarts.com

One of my gelatin prints.

The theme for Monday’s after school Art Together class was printmaking, so I decided to share gelatin plate printmaking. It was glorious chaos. Eighteen kids, eight gelatin plates, brayers and sponge brushes and palettes that needed to be shared. Bits of texture and stencils for playing with were strewn about, paint on tables and dripped on the floor and on hands. Thirty-six hands that had a really, really hard time resisting the tactile temptation of thick slabs of gelatin, even though they’d been told that touching it and, even worse, picking it up would degrade or even break it. With that many kids, it’s hard to get around to everybody who might need one-on-one help. I gave a demonstration and encouraged them to experiment and remember to share, because we had about two kids to a plate. Then I tried to check in on everybody.

It was great. Printmaking almost always is. It’s magical. Best to let them experiment and discover as much as possible on their own, with a little guidance if necessary. Some kids made collaboration prints all together and worked out who would take them home. Kids helped other kids. Some felt done after just one, and others made twenty.

Sampling of kids' gelatin plate prints at amyhoodarts.com

Just a small sample of the kids’ prints.

They layered prints and colors and textures with abandon, fearlessly, fabulously. I did not sit down for hours. One parent told me that she was grateful her son–one of the kids who printed right up until we were out of time–has taken to the activities in this program. He is put off by drawing, she said, but he has found inspiration here. Oh! Oh. When you find something you love to do that also brings a spark to others–how lucky is that? I need to figure out how to make this happen more often. Right now trying to do that is a casualty of being in limbo–I can’t lay the groundwork to broaden this work here, and I don’t know exactly where we’ll be next. But when the time comes, I’ll figure it out.

paint on my hands at amyhoodarts.com

Paint-y hands are happy hands.

I cleaned and wrapped the gelatin plates to bring home and store in my cold garage. Tuesday, I picked three of the better-looking ones and G, N, and I made some prints ourselves. N and I were too busy to make our own prints on Monday afternoon, and G was home sick with a fever both days.

One of N's gelatin prints at amyhoodarts.com

One of N’s gelatin prints.

Gelatin plate printmaking is so much fun, and the plates are easy to make, too. Art Together Issue Three: Printmaking has all the instructions on how to make a gelatin plate and get started printing with it.

Art Together Issue Six: Math + Art

{Click here to be taken directly to the sales page on Payhip. For UK/EU customers, VAT is added during the checkout process and isn’t reflected in the $4 USD price.}

I’ve been plugging along on the winter issue of Art Together and–thanks so much, polar vortex–even though it’s almost March, we’re still firmly in the midst of winter, so I don’t feel behind schedule at all even though I didn’t begin until I was sure I’d have a way to easily sell it no matter where you live (thanks so much, Payhip!). Introducing Issue Six: Math + Art:

Art Together Issue 6: Math + Art at amyhoodarts.com

From this issue’s Dear Reader:

Math and art are linked in so many ways. It’s not necessary to force a connection; it’s already there, and has been for centuries. This is a comforting idea for those of us who can feel intimidated or anxious by a wide-open, anything goes approach to art-making. I loved my photography classes (in the pre-digital days) precisely because of the mix of creativity and precision. Photography was part art, part science, and it provided a great balance for me. My photography notebook was, essentially, a lab notebook. What happens when you adjust the light? The ratio of chemicals? The exposure or development time? I enjoyed the experimentation and the structure. This mix satisfied both my creative and my logical sides. And while I have loosened up quite a bit over the years when it comes to art-making, I still am comforted by structure and limits at times.

I have a child who likes structure in his art-making as well, and this issue is created with kids and adults like him in mind. Here are some starting points, some guidelines, some ways in which the wonderful predictability of numbers and geometry and the science of how we see can be used to make art…

issue 6 collage copy

In this issue:

Dear Reader
Artist Spotlight: Bridget Riley
Featured Material: Colored Pencils by guest contributor Mo Awkati
Activity: Op Art—Weaving
Activity: Op Art—Distorted Shapes
Perspective
Activity: Drawing a Box in Perspective
The Fibonacci Sequence
Activity: Using Fibonacci Numbers
Activity: Mandalas
Resources
Try This: Op Art Backgrounds + Shapes

The 35-page PDF download is available for purchase through Payhip here for $4 USD. For UK/EU customers, VAT is added during the checkout process. Currently all issues of Art Together are listed for $4 USD; you can find them all right here.

Thanks for your continued support, emails, and comments when it comes to this little project of mine. I love seeing and hearing about what you and your kids are exploring and discovering together.

Teaching the Girl to Sew

Her first machine sewing project at amyhoodarts.com

Earlier this month, my 6yo daughter told me one of her goals for this year was to learn how to sew using the sewing machine. No problem! I told her when I taught myself how to sew I started with projects that involved straight lines, and we talked about some options. She, a girl after her mother’s heart, decided she wanted to start with a tote bag. We do love our things-to-put-other-things-in here. I showed her some options in Sew What! Bags, and she chose the Reversible Tote.

Now, I’d had some ideas of what to do with Saturday afternoon, involving baking banana bread and making some art with all the kids, but G was excited and raring to go, so I shifted gears so I could meet her enthusiasm with a great big YES. First thing we did was investigate mama’s fabric stash which, sadly, is stored in bins instead of on color-organized shelving, but we did the best we could. She selected several then decided which two to use. Her bag is as colorful as her typical outfits. (She used the same fabric for outer and lining, and the same heart fabric for both pockets because yep, she has an inside pocket too.)

Once she’d picked the fabrics, I pulled her Learning Tower over to the ironing board and I showed her how to iron. (Not too long after that, I knocked our iron off the board and it broke, but husband saved the day with his travel iron, which is JUST the right size for 6yo hands, too.) Then I cut out the pieces–I did that part, because it was all rectangles and I used the rotary cutter and plastic ruler and, well, that’s going to take some growing on her part, I think, before she can safely use it.

“NOW can we sew, Mama?” Not quite yet. Reading the directions, we saw it was time to iron some more to prepare the pockets. I held the fold, she pressed (and learned what it means to “press” rather than “iron”). Then I showed her the sewing machine and what the various dials mean and do. She sat on my lap and I operated the foot pedal while we practiced together. Then it was time to assemble the bag. (The rest of these pics were taken by my husband.)

sewing on the pocket at amyhoodarts.com

She raised and lowered the presser foot, kept the fabric aligned (with some guidance by me, less and less of it as we went on), raised and lowered the needle, rotated the fabric around corners, operated the reverse stitch switch for backstitching, removed pins, cut threads. She trimmed seam allowances and clipped corners. She pressed seams.

learning to machine sew at amyhoodarts.com

I included this photo because I love the look on her face! I think she’s concentrating there.

sewing with mama at amyhoodarts.com

When her bag was done she said, “I can’t believe I made this all by myself!” And I grinned because it wasn’t quite all by herself but it was, too–she didn’t just sit on my lap and have her hands there and sort of sew it. She was learning the steps of sewing, how the machine works, what needed to be done, what it means to clip corners and press seams and on and on. She rightly feels ownership of that bag, and what a good use of an afternoon, to begin to teach my girl how to sew. How wonderful to share something I like with someone who wants to learn.

Reading, Doing, Making, not Blogging

I’ve sort of neglected this space this month. Partly it’s that I’ve been reading and researching, trying things out, making things (more talismans, mainly), preparing and teaching, and by the time I get to the end of the day I never get around to sharing. Partly it’s the January-almost-February doldrums…despite what I’ve just listed, most days it feels like I haven’t actually accomplished anything, or finished anything. This feeling is, I’m sure, exacerbated by the continuing limbo of not having sold our house yet. There are some things I’d like to plan and such and they really do need to wait until we are where we’re going to be. Doldrum-y limbo, that’s uncertainty in January all right.

Anyway, some photos of some things, in reverse order of occurrence.

watercolor and ink mandala at amyhoodarts.com

A mandala, completed this week, first doodled in ink and then colored with watercolor. A very soothing thing to do.

Last weekend I decided my earrings needed to be out of crowded jewelry box and somewhere I could see them. After finding this on Pinterest, I decided to keep my decorative metal sheet whole and hang it on the wall as is. My earrings would never fit in an 8×10 frame.

earring holder at amyhoodarts.com

I might still space them out a bit–I have the room. I also have room to add more. Let me tell you about me and earrings–before I had kids, I wore earrings every day. I really liked them, and while I never wore overmuch makeup or jewelry, earrings were a part of my outfit. Then I had kids and years and years of small people understandably attracted to shiny dangling things, perched on my hip within grabbing distance, so I stopped wearing them. So many years of this that I thought my holes had closed up. But no! A couple of years ago I decided to reclaim my earrings and even buy more. It’s a small way of getting back to that pre-mother Amy and I enjoy them. My kids do, too, because, as my daughter said, when they’re not sure what to get me for Mother’s Day or my birthday, they can always pick out earrings. My mother-in-law has given me some gorgeous pairs as well. Liking earrings makes it easy on gift-givers! It’s a win-win.

On to teaching… I’d love to have a studio/classroom space of my own one day where I could offer classes. At our last class (we didn’t have one this week because Monday was not a school day), we talked about different types of line and Piet Mondrian. When I showed a Mondrian and asked what sort of feeling it gave them, one girl said “quiet.” Yes, I feel that way about his paintings too. The orderly frame of lines, the limited palette–soothing. Then we made tape-resist paintings using primaries and black (ie, Mondrian’s palette). I showed them several examples of tape-resist paintings. One I’d done as “inspired by” Mondrian. Another, my son had used the tape as roads on a map. Another showed an abstract design made by the tape. I told them they could be inspired by Mondrian but they could also do their own thing entirely, because it’s their project. I’m very clear on this: I’m not out for cookie-cutter projects. And they all had ideas. One boy wanted to recreate the Union Jack, so he got an atlas to consult, used the tape to form the lines, painted blue, then filled in the tape lines (after peeling) with red. Another girl placed four pieces of tape vertically, painted the whole paper black, and ended up with a striking and minimalist black and white painting. I am always impressed with kids’ ideas, always.

These are my kids’ paintings, which I can share here. G was Mondrian inspired but in many directions.

tape-resist in Mondrian's palette at amyhoodarts.com

N did his the next day, since he’s on duty as a helper (and an excellent one) during class time.

tape resist using Mondrian's palette at amyhoodarts.com

He painted white on white, too, which might be observable if you click right on the photo–I’m not sure. It’s quite an effect in person.

So, that’s more or less what I’ve been up to. I run when I can to try to combat the irritability that seems to be cropping up (see: doldrum-y limbo). I’m reading books on all sorts of topics for the next issue. I’m getting ready for a quick scouting trip down to Maryland. I’m driving kids to school and appointments and activities and feeding them all the time. You know. The usual.

Why Hello, 2015

I was exhausted entering the holiday season. I think two straight months of cleaning and decluttering a 5-person house will do that to anyone. But the two holiday weeks–even with the cooking and such–were restorative. I needed that restful time, the reading, creating, sleeping late (by which I mean 8 am versus 6:15), the indoor days. Although I wasn’t keen on returning to the regular schedule this week, with its early mornings, lots of driving time, and schooling the 10yo, I do feel energized and ready to take it all on.

“All” includes a five-week after-school program at my kids’ school built around the Art Together zines. This has been in the works–originally scheduled for the fall–but with one thing and another it started this week. This is a Very Good Thing. I really enjoy working with kids in this way, and it’s a good experience for me as well. The group is larger than I anticipated, so I conscripted both my boys to help out. They are wonderful at this–they’ve both helped out in these settings before, and they know the materials and the activities. They are extra hands to fetch clean water or more paint or even answer questions. We started with the color wheel and color mixing this week. I just have all good feelings about all of it, for everybody involved.

I’ve also stocked up on library books as I begin researching the next issue of Art Together.

research at amyhoodarts.com

This is one of my favorite parts, y’all.

I received a metal stamping kit for Christmas, and I’ve been making talismans for some folks I know….

talismans at amyhoodarts.com

I have more to make. Bit by bit.

And finally, I paid for a membership to the University athletic complex again, month by month this winter (because who knows when we might move??), so I can run on their indoor track. I like running. I do not like cold. Every time I see a runner outside all bundled up I feel a little guilty, but…I run because it’s pleasurable. Running IS the means to the end. I’m not doing it for any other outcome but to enjoy the running, and running in bitter cold is more akin to torture for me, and I’m not into suffering, really. (On the flip side, unlike many, I don’t mind running in 95% humidity in the summer. To each his own.) So I’d rather pay the monthly fee and run indoors in shorts and a t-shirt, even if running perfectly flat circles gets a little boring–it’s warm and dry and the air doesn’t hurt my lungs and I start running and I can’t help smiling. Also, since it’s indoors, I’ll listen to music, which I won’t do while running on the road, when I want to hear approaching cars. So it’s a different sort of workout but it still clears my brain and gets me moving and I love it. Which is the whole, entire point of running for me.

So. How is your 2015 starting out?

A Second Dress (Better Than the First?)

Ladybug dress at amyhoodarts.com

The second dress is complete, y’all. And it’s better than the first, because it has inside, hidden pockets.

pockets! at amyhoodarts.com

G likes it better because she likes short sleeves–while I’m wearing a thermal shirt, sweater, and wool socks, she’s running around in short sleeves and no socks at all. I’m happy about the pockets but already know I can do better on the next dress, whenever that happens. (I’m out of jersey knit fabric at the moment.) I keep admiring these dresses, the way the sleeves are sewn into the opening so well, the pleating, the way I did much better hemming the sleeves on the ladybug dress and they don’t flare at all. Another headband was requested, so I whipped that up after these pictures were taken.

twirling at amyhoodarts.com

New play dresses need twirling pictures. Of course!

Leveling Up: Sewn Knit Dress

At the end of the summer, my daughter picked out some Charley Harper knit fabric so I could make her some dresses. I’d seen the Anna Maria Horner Lemon Drop pattern and for some reason, that was the pattern that made me decide to figure out sewing with knits. I ordered it and made the top for myself first (I’d rather mess up learn on my own clothes than my daughter’s) and the shoulders were huge. I mean, just, humongous. I looked at the pictures on the pattern again and Googled for some finished examples and compared the girls’ pattern pieces to some of my daughter’s clothing and realized that using the Charley Harper fabric to make this pattern for her would be throwing good money after bad.

I discussed with the Twitter brain trust and ended up ordering the Oliver + S family pack of t-shirt patterns, with the idea of adjusting it to make a dress. (The shoulders on this are actually designed to fit regular people, even!) I shortened the t-shirt and added a skirt, which is just two rectangles, each the width of the full circumference of the shirt. And we have a dress, just perfect for a six-year-old.

Charley Harper dress at amyhoodarts.com

The full skirt twirls nicely, too.

amyhoodarts.com

I made her a matching headband from scraps because why not? I added patch pockets to this one, using the pattern pieces from the AMH pattern, I think just to make myself feel better for having spent the money on a pattern that I can’t use. I’m not happy with the patch pockets; they’re going to droop. So on her next dress–ladybugs, short sleeves, but otherwise the same concept–I decided to try interior pockets. I consulted my sewing reference book and one of her Lands’ End knit dresses and got to work.

interior pockets in progress at amyhoodarts.com

I’m not done with that dress just yet–I want to reinforce the pocket openings (I already know how I’d do it a little different next time) and then I just need to sew the skirt to the tee and I’m done. I’m particularly happy with how the skirt is sewn in on the first one. I pleated all that extra fabric in. Careful pleating, pinning, and sewing. Here’s how it looks from the inside…

pleating from inside the dress at amyhoodarts.com

and a close-up of the outside.

pleating on sewn knit dress at amyhoodarts.com

It turns out sewing with knits was the least of the difficulties here–the pattern I originally chose was unworkable. I’m pretty chuffed that I put this together and I love the Oliver + S t-shirt pattern. I think I’ll get lots of use out of that. The second time, the shirt whipped up quickly. The only place I had difficulty with the knit fabric itself was hemming the sleeves. They ended up with a slight flare, which I decided to call a design element. And you know what? My daughter told me (without knowing I’d struggled with the sleeve hems) that her favorite part was the way the cuffs ruffled a bit. There you go. Best dress ever (until the ladybug dress is finished!).

Jon Scieszka-Inspired Writing Workshop

Don't Forget to WriteNot too long ago, I saw the book Don’t Forget To Write in the poets.org email newsletter and ordered it more or less on a whim. It looked good. Tuesday, all my kids were home for Election Day, so I decided to plan a writing workshop from one of the ideas in the book. I like having all my kids home, and while it’s true that in many ways, my middle child is less distracted when he’s the only one home, many explorations work better in a group. Some alchemy exists when ideas are shared, and who can deny the thrill of immediate positive feedback*?

This book is full of activities written by writing workshop leaders, including published authors, and I don’t remember the last time I browsed a kids’ writing book and wanted to try just about all the prompts. This book is good. Because we enjoy Jon Scieszka’s books, I decided to begin with his “lesson,” which consists of him sharing the inspiration for many of his books and inviting us to write stories in the same way. We own The Stinky Cheese Man, and I brought home a couple more from the library last week and left them around so they’d be fresh in the kids’ minds.

Scieszka books

The Stinky Cheese Man is a book of “fairly stupid tales,” created by changing something in a fairy tale in order to make it, well, stupid. Squids Will Be Squids is a book of fables written, Scieszka says, by taking stories of annoying or gross habits, turning the people involved into animals, and attaching a lesson. And The True Story of the Three Little Pigs is simply a fairy tale written from another character’s point of view.

And so we all got to writing, or dictating, in the case of my 6yo. She chose to tell the story of the Three Billy Goats Gruff from the troll’s point of view, that poor tired troll, who was trying to take a nap and got woken up by all that trip-trapping over his head, plus a very bad headache, too. My middle child also visited the troll and billy goats, creating a fairly stupid tale by having the troll yell so loudly at the goats that they fell right off the bridge and died, so he ate them. I took the testimony of the duck, the dog, and the cat, who never showed an interest in gardening and wouldn’t have planted the seed anyway, so why is the Little Red Hen so grumpy over pursuing her own hobbies? And my oldest, my almost-teen, good-naturedly agreed to participate and then wrote this fable, which he said I could share. It made me laugh out loud.

Turtle had a pretty good life. Most of the time, he was able to do what he pleased. But one day, Lion came by. Turtle had a day off from work, so he was looking forward to a day of relaxing. But Lion had other ideas. Her cubs were doing schoolwork, and she thought that turtle should do it too, even though it was his day off. So she had him do work and constantly reminded him of what to do.

Moral: Some people don’t enjoy the same things as others. Think of others’ point of view.

For the record, he laughed out loud reading Squids Will Be Squids, and he contributed really good comments on everybody else’s stories. Maybe I can talk him into sitting in on another writing workshop with us on Veteran’s Day…

*The kids were told before anybody read out loud: We’ll be sharing something we like about each other’s stories. This was a workshop focused on generating ideas and getting words down, not tearing apart and revision.

A Frozen Birthday

My sweet, extroverted girl started school this year, and every day I hear about what she did with the other girls in her class. Within days she knew all their names, and she tells me about their make-believe games during recess and what they talk about and she is obviously enjoying that aspect of school so much. We don’t host “friends” birthday parties for the kids every year, but I wanted G to have a chance to experience that with this set of school friends. She was so, so excited at the idea of having her school friends over to her house. So despite everything else going on–cleaning and clearing and travel and listing the house–we planned a party, inspired by her favorite movie, Frozen.

amyhoodarts.com

I suppose we really ought to remove the streamers before we show the house to anyone, but I kind of don’t want to.

amyhoodarts.com

Table set and awaiting guests to arrive. While we waited for everyone, we had snow globes to make, with pre-glued penguins.

amyhoodarts.com

Goodness but these snow globes gave me fits. We have one that we made five years ago and the penguin is still firmly affixed. I used the same waterproof glue, yet some of these penguins became swimmers, and we had some leakage problems around the lids. Everyone was very nice about it, but it does gall me a bit.

After making snow globes (with glitter, of course), we went on a treasure hunt. The first clue led the girls to love expert trolls, an idea I got from this site.

"love expert" pet rock trolls at amyhoodarts.com

Some had already been scooped up when I snapped this photo. The rest look a little nervous about it, don’t they? I’d like to glue googly eyes onto everything now. These rocks just kill me.

G and N both helped with the treasure hunt planning. G decided what treats we should include, and N helped me with hiding places and clues. The girls received Frozen pencils and stickers, sparkly play-dough “snowballs,” and plastic costume jewelry necklaces (fit for a princess, of course). V came along too to help with general herding, and at cake-and-ice-cream time, he poured out lemonade for all the girls. It was a lovely bonus of the party to see my boys helping to make sure their younger sister and her guests enjoyed themselves.

amyhoodarts.com

And enjoy herself she did. She was so sad when it was time for her guests to go home, but she also thanked me for throwing her a party. I’m so glad we did. Lots of big things are happening here, but it’s important to mark the special days, too, and not let them get lost in the shuffle. A party full of little girls (in sparkly costumes!) is a new experience in this family and it was just about the sweetest thing ever. A perfectly perfect way to spend a Saturday afternoon in late October.