Tag Archives: kidblog

Making + Listening::14/2014

Lots of photos to share this week, some of which are better than others in terms of quality. First up, my daughter’s embroidery from a few weeks ago, that I have neglected to share. She drew on the felt with the nifty disappearing-ink fabric marker and then embroidered over her lines. (We just don’t go in for embroidering other people’s patterns here!)

5yo's embroidery at amyhoodarts.com

Drawing and embroidery by G, age 5.

This is a fairy–the semi-circles on the sides are wings. I love this–she has preserved her own drawing in fabric and floss!! (I helped with the eyes–I did the French knots. But she did the rest herself.) This was completely her idea. I think of all those Pinterest-type projects that have adults transferring kids’ drawings to fabric to embroider or turn into pillows and I look at my daughter’s self-created, self-directed activity with her own drawing that she then embroidered herself, and it’s just perfection. So much better than if I had embroidered it. Her small capable hands did this.

Those wonderful hands of hers also learned how to use the knitting tower this week.

using the knitting tower at amyhoodarts.com

Blurry cell-phone picture of G using the knitting tower.

We’ve had this for years and years and neither boy was ever much interested, but, much like her mama, G likes to make things with her hands, and she took to this right away. While she was sitting there finger knitting, I was working on a knotted, beaded ankle bracelet.

knotted anklet in progress at amyhoodarts.com

Another blurry cell phone picture, of my knotted anklet in progress.

This started with making a beachy bracelet out of string while we were at the beach one day, using directions from the book Summer Crafts by Marjorie Galen (a used bookstore find several years ago, and I love it; it also inspired our hot rocks).

Beachy knotted bracelet at amyhoodarts.com

Beachy bracelet.

After making that one, I made a few more (just to keep my hands busy), and then I wondered if I could add beads. I have a necklace purchased a while ago that looks very similar to this simple knotting, but with beads. So I bought some thin hemp string and got to work. This is the finished anklet (and I’m out of body lotion for my legs, as I’m sure you can tell by this close-up photo).

knotted beaded anklet at amyhoodarts.com

I LOVE THIS ANKLET.

We’re not done yet! I also finished a baby sweater and hat this week. It’s for one of my husband’s co-workers. Gah it’s so cute!!

baby sweater + hat at amyhoodarts.com

The details are on Ravelry. I hardly knit at all these days unless I’m making something as a gift. It was nice to pick up the needles again–this little sweater worked up fast, too. I began it on the second day of the Tour de France, and they’re not done cycling yet.

Finally, yesterday I added “draw and paint sunflowers” on my to-do list. Do you do that–add on the fun things to your list, to give the same importance as the chores? I do. I cleaned the bathrooms yesterday as well, but I made sure drawing and painting was also a priority. My daughter sat next to me and we both quietly looked, drew, and painted for quite some time. Here’s my finished page.

Sunflower sketchbook page at amyhoodarts.com

As for listening, I got to hear the most amazing (and at times inane) conversations Tuesday as we sat in traffic on 95. We visited the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, and instead of 90 minutes each way it was at least two hours. That’s a lot of car time! (Thanks, Massachusetts, for the construction.) My boys finished the books they’d brought well before we got anywhere near home, so they began discussing who they’d pick for a multi-universe superhero all-star team (that’s what it sounded like, anyway–both DC and Marvel characters, who would your top 20 be and why?). After a while they exhausted that topic and moved onto discussing which body part they’d willingly give up if necessary. (My practical 12yo said appendix. Mine’s already been removed and I don’t miss it at all.) That conversation quickly veered into the surreal. Four hours of driving with three kids. The things you overhear.

Phew! I’m linking up with Jen again this week. How about you? What are you making? Overhear any good conversations lately?

Art Together Samples Available

art together color logo_cropped

Just a quick post to say I’ve added some samples from previous issues of Art Together, available as PDF downloads. They’re all listed on the main Art Together page as well as in the individual pages’ contents listings. If you’ve been wondering what the zine has to offer in terms of tone, content, and information, hopefully this will help! And as always, email me at amyhood at amyhoodarts dot com with any questions.

The available PDFs are:

The Color Wheel from Issue One: Color
Drawing With Tape from Issue Two: Line
Artist Spotlight: Hokusai from Issue Three: Printmaking
Scratch Foam Prints from Issue Three: Printmaking

Postcard Idea: Color Collage

color theme postcards copy

This week, in support of the Summer Mail Art Swap, we’re sharing the simple idea of making a color collage postcard. The first thing to do is choose a couple of main colors to focus on and gather materials. We have a cigar box of small paper scraps and an expanding file folder of larger scraps and collage papers that are more or less sorted by color. That makes gathering colored papers easier.

I chose red and yellow, so I looked through our papers and chose some I liked. I used a 4×6″ piece of prepared cereal box as my substrate.

Go ahead and gather more paper than you'll need. It's good to have choices as you work.

Go ahead and gather more paper than you’ll need. It’s good to have choices as you work.

My son chose orange and green, and my daughter chose blue and pink. Each selected the papers they wanted to use and arranged them–without gluing–onto their postcard until they were happy. I glued some things down while still arranging. Work in whatever way suits you. We glued our pieces down using gel medium and an old paintbrush. I brushed a final coat of gel medium over all my pieces to seal them down. Make sure all the edges are secure so nothing gets caught in the mail sorting machinery.

color theme postcards

My daughter’s blue and pink postcard is on the top left, my yellow and red one is on the top right, and my son’s green and orange one is on the bottom. This is also a fun way to experiment with different and perhaps unusual color combinations.

There’s still plenty of time to join in with the mail art swap. All the details are here.

Other posts in this series:
Postcard Substrates: What to Use
Postcard Idea: Found Poetry
Postcard Q + A

Postcard Q + A

{Claudine is giving away a copy of Art Together: Issue Four–you have one more day to enter!}

In support of The Summer Mail Art Swap, this week I’m answering some questions I’ve heard. Let’s go!

Is my two-year-old too young to participate?

Nope! Everybody’s art is welcome.

My 5yo daughter wanted to photograph this letter before sending it to her penpal.

My 5yo daughter wanted to photograph this letter before sending it to her penpal.

Suppose my child doesn’t want to mail his or her artwork away?

We deal with this as well. My daughter is very comfortable with giving away her drawings and creations, but my boys, not so much. Sometimes we’ve made one to keep and one to send. We’ve taken pictures before sending letters or artwork along. You could make color photocopies or scan in original artwork. But ultimately, some kids just aren’t ready or willing to give away something they created, and I’ve never insisted.

How will I know you received our postcards?

I’ll send you an email when I receive your envelope. If you mailed them out but haven’t heard from me by July 31, let me know they’re on their way. I’ll wait.

Isn’t it risky to just put the postcards in the mail without an envelope?

It can be. It depends upon what medium is used. Acrylics won’t bleed once they’re dry. Watercolors and water-based printmaking ink will. I usually just drop them in the mail and cross my fingers, figuring that the postal service tries not to let the mail get wet, and if it did, being in an envelope probably wouldn’t save a water-based art piece from running. But there are some things you can do.

First, make sure any glued-down pieces are thoroughly glued down, so no loose edges catch on anything and tear. You can seal the entire postcard with gel medium to help with loose bits and to protect it a bit. One participant wrote in to say they sealed their watercolor postcards with clear packing tape and their pastel postcards by brushing on a layer of lightly watered down school glue. These are great ideas using items you probably already have in the house.

Any other questions? Leave a comment! And there’s still plenty of time to participate. All the details are right here. Also check out Postcard Substrates: What to Use and Postcard Idea: Found Poetry.

Summering

We got back to the beach last week.

At the salt pond behind the barrier beach.

At the salt pond behind the barrier beach.

Last summer I didn’t take my kids to the beach at all. If you know me you know how strange this is; I was working on some other things last summer, mainly, getting myself back on track from PTSD. (This post has more information if you’re new here and curious.) It’s now been about 13 months since I began a low daily dose of Zoloft and, to be succinct, I am grateful a medicine choice exists that I can take and that works for me without side-effects. Zoloft doesn’t change who I am; it allows me to be who I am. Part of that is the mom who packs up the kids and a lunch and towels and sunscreen and toys and books and heads to the beach for six hours. Last summer, even though I knew I’d done that for years, I couldn’t quite fathom how. It all sounded exhausting and too much, just too much.

It’s nice to be back.

Spider crab

Spider crab

The pond was full of spider crabs last week. We never know what we might see there, but it’s always interesting. The pond is shallow (no more than about 4.5 feet throughout) and calm and warmer than the ocean, especially at this time of year. The kids can paddle, and we can get close up with the critters that live there. It’s a different experience from the beach-beach, and we like to mix it up and do some of both each summer.

Last weekend we headed to Beavertail State Park for some tidepooling.

Tidepooling

Tidepooling

We mostly saw very tiny invasive crabs–Asian Shore Crabs–and periwinkles. Beavertail is a beautiful place, with lots of rocks for scampering over.

Beavertail State Park, Jamestown, RI.

Beavertail State Park, Jamestown, RI.

Being near and in salt water is a very happy thing for me. Spending much of last summer sitting on my deck with a book while my kids happily played in the yard (they didn’t have a bad summer, trust me) was the right thing to do. But I’m glad we’re back to spending more time in the sea and sun.

Postcard Idea: Found Poetry

Postcard Idea: Found Poetry at amyhoodarts.com

Suppose you want to participate in the summer postcard swap but you’re not sure what to do artistically? You could do something with words instead–such as found poetry.

To do this, first we looked through magazines, newspapers, and old books (the ones we have set aside for collage purposes) for interesting phrases that we liked. This is obviously easier for kids who can read, but my 5yo really wanted to join in, so I read phrases aloud to her and she cut out ones that she liked. But otherwise, let kids choose phrases they like themselves, with no in-between.

found poetry postcard at amyhoodarts.com

Background: Liquid watercolors.

When we had phrases, we created the backgrounds. These can be as simple or complex as you’d like. Most of the ones here just use watercolors.

found poetry postcard at amyhoodarts.com

Background: Ink doodles colored in with colored pencils.

I like to collect the phrases first and then arrange something from what I have, but my 12yo looked for phrases for a specific idea. There are no hard and fast rules here. The fun is in combining words that you didn’t find together to begin with.

found poetry postcard at amyhoodarts.com

Background: Watercolor, with Sharpie pictures added after words were glued down.

My 5yo had me read all her cut-out phrases to her and then she arranged them according to some internal 5yo order. It came out sounding a bit like the Giant’s story in The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales–which is also a pretty fun outcome.

We used a glue stick to adhere our words to our postcards. The ones with watercolor backgrounds are on watercolor paper, and the one with a colored pencil background is on Bristol board. You could do this on a solid color background, too…use whatever is on hand.

Have you started working on postcards yet? Share your thoughts/ideas in the comments, or add photos in progress to the Art Together Flickr group. And don’t forget to spread the word about the swap–the more the merrier!

Postcard Substrates–What to Use?

As part of the Summer Mail Art Swap, I’ll be posting ideas, links, and tutorials, hopefully every Monday. This week, let’s talk about the postcard substrate–in other words, what you’ll be creating your original postcard art on.

possible postcard substrates at amyhoodarts.com

You can buy blank postcards, of course, such as the watercolor postcards pictured above, but you don’t have to. This is just a pad of 4″x6″ sheets of watercolor paper. It’s far cheaper to cut watercolor paper down to size yourself.

The yellow pad is Bristol board. I’ll admit, this is one of my favorite surfaces for collage and postcards. It cost about $6 for 20 sheets, each of which can produce 4 postcards. (It was $10, but I had a 40% off coupon at my local art store.)

However, you don’t need to buy a thing. Save your cardboard boxes from the recycling bin–they make great surfaces for postcards! The blank inside is perfect for writing on. You can paint or collage right onto the side with the image, or you can cover it with gesso first to start with a blank white surface. If you want to do that, here’s how.

First, I cut off the side, top, and bottom flaps so I have two even rectangles. Then I lightly sanded it with fine sandpaper. This roughs up the surface so the gesso goes on better.

prepping a cereal box for gesso at amyhoodarts.com

Then apply a layer of gesso, which you can find in art stores or big-box craft stores in the art supply aisle. I’m not using a fancy brush; I got this one at the hardware store for probably a dollar.

painting gesso on cereal box at amyhoodarts.com

Once it was dry, I decided I wanted a second coat, so I lightly sanded again and painted on another coat of gesso. All done–ready to be worked on!

gessoed cereal box at amyhoodarts.com

You can cut them to size first and work on them small, or collage and paint first and then cut them down, as I demonstrate here.

Karen has a helpful post with 10 “cheap or free” items you can use for postcard substrates, too.

Summer Mail Art Swap For Kids (And Their Adults!)

Summer Mail Art Swap at amyhoodarts.comMy kids and I thought it would be a lot of fun to host a handmade postcard swap for kids and families. They’ve seen me participate in some and get some really neat artwork back in the mail, and they’d like to do it, too. So we’d like to invite you to join in the Summer Mail Art Swap For Kids (And Their Adults).

The details are simple. Make some handmade postcards. I’ll post ideas, links, and tutorials over the next several weeks. Mail me your postcards (details below) by July 31, and we’ll sort them and send them out to someone else. Look for your one-of-a-kind artwork to arrive in the mail in August.

Why are we having them all mailed to us first? To avoid disappointment, mainly. It’s bad enough participating in a swap and getting nothing in return as an adult; it’s really, really disappointing for kids. I’m borrowing heavily from fabulous interviewee Karen’s instructions for her swaps (with her permission), with one added step. I don’t want my physical house address up on my blog in this post, so if you plan to participate, email me at amyhood at amyhoodarts dot com with the subject line “Summer postcard swap” and I’ll send you another copy of the details below, along with my mailing address.

I’m not posting a theme for this—go ahead and make any sort of postcard you want. Keep in mind it won’t be mailed to its final recipient in an envelope, though, because it’s a postcard (postcard dimensions are included in the details below). You could….paint, draw, collage, write a poem or a story or a cartoon, use a photograph, stitch, anything at all that you can think of, as long as it can be mailed. Like I said, we’ll share ideas here, too. And THIS IS OPEN TO ADULTS TOO. Because we make art together, you see, and the kids don’t get to have all the fun. Wouldn’t it be great to sit down for a family postcard-making session? However, I do want kids to get kid postcards, and adults to get adult postcards, so check the details on how to mark them.

Questions? Let me know. And share this post! This is open to anyone who wants to participate—you don’t need to have purchased a zine or be a regular reader. The more the merrier. Let’s have a summer of postcard creation and sharing!

The detailed directions:

Each person who makes and sends a postcard will get one back, addressed to him or her individually. Submit as many postcards as you want per person, all in the same envelope to me (you will get back the same number you send). Make sure you insert waxed paper or parchment in between the cards so they don’t get stuck together in the envelope, though.

Write “Summer Postcard Swap” on the back of your card, and please add an A if the card is by an adult and a C if it’s by a child.

It’s a good idea to write your return address on the back of the postcard (in case of postal delivery problems). You may also want to include an (adult’s) email address or website so the recipient can thank you. If your family is sending multiple postcards, you may receive postcards from various families. You might make some new friends!

A note for your partner is a nice touch. But remember I need half the postcard for the address. I use washi tape to divide my postcard backs, but drawing a line works too. Anything to help remind yourself to leave that right half blank.

Write what you want on the left side. Leave the right side open.

Include a mailing label with your name and address for each card you create. I’ll attach them to the cards I mail back to you. Return address labels work for this too. Please include the proper postage for each postcard you send (see below for postal guidelines).

International swappers are welcome–the postage cost is $1.15 per card and you can send that to me via Paypal (amyhood at amyhoodarts dot com).

DO NOT attach the stamps to your postcards, because I might be sending it to someone overseas! Just slip them into the envelope.

Postage and Card Size

You are welcome to make any size postcard you want, but please pay attention to the following postal guidelines:

In order to use the postcard rate ($.34) your card cannot be bigger than 4.25 x 6 inches, and it must be thin and flexible.  A 4×6 card that is thick, lumpy, or doesn’t bend needs more postage.

If your card is a rectangle bigger than a postcard, but still flat and flexible, a regular “forever” ($.49 ) stamp is what you need.

To keep things simple, stick to a basic rectangle so you can use one of those two stamp options.

You can find all the postal specifications (and a handy postage calculator) here: http://postcalc.usps.gov/

Again, questions? Email me at amyhood at amyhoodarts.com.

Meet Karen

Karen Isaacson, interviewed in Art Together Issue Four

Karen Isaacson, interviewed in Art Together Issue Four

Karen describes herself as a “paint flinger, salamander catcher, and all-around goofball,” and I can attest that she is as fun and interesting and quirky in person as she seems on her blog, I Am Rushmore. Karen began art-making well into her grown-up years, and she approaches it with the sense of exploration, curiosity, and enthusiasm for the process (versus a focus solely on product) that I hope to nurture in others through Art Together. So I was happy she agreed to be interviewed for Issue Four, which focuses on mixed media–something Karen does so well.

As an early childhood educator, I preached the benefits of process-oriented art with young children. The toddlers I worked with never cared about what they were making, they simply delighted in the act of creating. I sat on the floor and played along with them, and it was the favorite part of my day. Perhaps I’m just a slow learner, but it never occurred to me that this same spirit of open-ended, joyful exploration could be applied to adult art experiences.

The rest of Karen’s interview can be found in the latest issue, along with lots of other inspiration and ideas. Along with her personal blog, Karen also maintains the website Mail Me Some Art, facilitating a mind-bloggling number of themed mail art swaps. She has several open swaps right now, including tape postcards, favorite city postcards, and handmade envelopes. She scans and posts all the artwork she receives (2500 pieces last year!) before sending them on their way through the postal system, so the site provides a constant stream of gorgeous art inspiration.

I hope to continue including interviews in future issues of Art Together, because I think it’s so encouraging to get to know people who are pursuing their artistic passions right now. There are so many ways to do that! I’m not sure that reminder can come often enough.

Art Together Issue Four: Mixed Media

Art Together Issue Four at amyhoodarts.comA week later than planned but worth the wait, I hope: Art Together Summer 2014: Mixed Media is out in the world today. This is Issue Four, which means a year ago, I was just fleshing out my idea for this zine. Now my green Moleskine that I use as my external brain for this project is full of notes, to-do lists, and brainstorming, and four whole issues exist in reality.

My goal all along has been to provide encouragement and inspire confidence, to demystify art supplies, terms, and techniques, so adults can feel comfortable playing and exploring right alongside kids. Art-making is so much fun and I’ve discovered how vital it is to my sense of well-being. It’s not fair to leave it all to the kids; we adults need it too. And exploring together has been so wonderful for us.

This issue’s focus, Mixed Media/Collage, so easily lends itself to play. Mixed media really is as simple as using more than one artistic medium, in other words, combining art materials. In this issue we learn about the artist Joseph Cornell and create our own assemblage boxes. We play with found paper, collage, photographs, and whatever art materials we choose to combine. We make our own collage book and learn about different types of glue. And we interview Karen Isaacson, the organizational mastermind behind Mail Me Some Art.

We have some fun things coming up, too–some give-aways, an excerpt from Karen’s interview to share, and, inspired by her swaps of mail art, my kids and I will be organizing a mail art swap for kids. That’ll be open to anyone who’s interested, of course, whether or not you purchase Art Together. Check for details before the end of June (hopefully as soon as next week). Here’s to a fun summer of art-making!

All the details on Issue Four, including how to purchase, can be found right here. (Psst: Use code ARTPLAY for 20% off through July 31.)