Category Archives: printmaking

Making + Listening

Now that Issue Two is out in the world, I really want to get my hands into some off-computer creating. Of course lots of art-making goes on while creating the magazine, but the last push is very much on the computer, and the very last bit is sorting out the tech-stuff, which is getting easier but still gives me a bit of a headache. So it was a treat to put together this card to send to a pen-pal.

notecard at amyhoodarts.com

That’s a hand-carved stamp printed on Kraft card stock, colored in with a colored pencil, surrounded by a glued-on watercolor/salt effect border. Yay! Making things with my hands is so…necessary.

I also started a pair of socks for my eldest, having finished his mittens. (He has gloves, too, but at 12 he still appreciates and wants hand-knit mittens from his mama. Love.)

beginning of a sock at amyhoodarts.com

He isn’t typically a bright-color kid (his mittens are black), but he only wears handknit socks to bed, so I’m guessing that explains this rather bright yarn. We were more concerned if it felt okay. It would be nice to have these finished in time for Christmas, but knitting socks for him no longer means quickly whipping up some kid-sized socks; it’s just the same as knitting a pair for me. His new snow boots, in fact, fit me. (!!) However, he’s a good-natured kid and will happily accept partly finished socks and a promise, if it comes to that.

As for the listening part, I’ve been listening to my youngest nonstop. We’ve also been listening to Christmas music, but when I need a break–and sometimes I do–I turn it to the 80s station to pep myself up a bit. And I’ve been overdosing on Of Monsters and Men and loving it.

How about you? What are you making and listening to? I’m linking up with Dawn again here.

Notebooks in the Shop

I’ve added some new items to the shop, including some hand-colored and hand-stamped notebooks, like this one:

daisy moleskine notebook at amyhoodarts.com

And this one:

tree moleskine notebook at amyhoodarts.com

And a couple of others. I also added two new embroidered pouches:

I sewed both of these together this past weekend, and when I was completely finished–turning hole sewn closed by hand, pockets ironed–I regarded them with what can only be described as satisfaction. I am pleased by them, in that quiet way that comes of creating the thing that you envisioned. Sometimes I get that feeling from a piece of writing, too, the sense that it expressed exactly what I was trying to say. That’s a good feeling, a feeling worth slogging through the not-quite-right attempts in order to achieve.

Anyway, I suppose if I ever lose that feeling with these pouches, I’ll have to move onto making something else, because I hope the sense of care and satisfaction hangs around them like an aura, packaged and mailed right along with the pouch.

Grounded!

I’ve been looking forward to changing the clocks back because it pushes sunrise early enough that I can fit in a morning run for a few more weeks. However, after some on-and-off calf pain became more severe Saturday, I did the smart thing and didn’t go on any more runs until I saw a sports medicine-minded orthopedist. Luckily, he had a cancellation on Tuesday so I was able to see him quickly. He confirmed what I suspected–a shin splint, only in the left leg. (Weird, right? More on that in a minute.) I need to stop running until the pain is gone, which is hard, hard, hard. It’s my form of active meditation. It’s been integral to my mental health. That’s why I quickly decided it was worth it to get myself to a doctor who’d assess me properly. He referred me to the running clinic at the office’s associated physical therapy center, where I’ll have my gait evaluated–I’m looking forward to that in a tech-y, science-y way too. I have to wait almost three weeks for that, though, because he doesn’t want me running on the treadmill until I’m free of pain. He did say I could walk, though, as long as it doesn’t hurt, so I’m back to sunrise walks. It’s not the same, but it gives me quiet, sort-of-active time alone before the demands of the day descend.

As for the one-leg-only phenomenon, the doctor double-checked that my right leg had no pain at all. “Do you run on the side of the road?” he asked.

“Oh yes,” I said. “Facing traffic.”

“Always?” I confirmed yes, pretty much always. The roads in our neighborhood have a very pronounced camber, and running facing traffic means my left leg is always on the downward angle. I’d love to see a digital recreation of that, with all the forces and angles shown, with equations of how the force is unevenly distributed and messing up my left leg. Interesting, no? In a physics kind of way? That might not be the reason–thus the gait evaluation–but it can’t be helping.

Anyway, I have a stack of books to read, I’m writing daily (following along with Amanda’s prompts), and Wednesday afternoon I spent some time printing onto Moleskine notebooks.

printed notebooks at amyhoodarts.com

Some of these will be teacher gifts, but I think some will end up in the shop. It’s kind of an experiment. As for the running hiatus, I’m trying to keep perspective. The conundrum is that running is a big part of how I keep my perspective with everything else. May the shin heal quickly…

How To: Freezer Paper Stencils

Slide2For the second year, I’m a part of a fantasy football league run by Diane of CraftyPod. It’s a fun way to connect with other creative women who also love football. Because I’m first and foremost a Patriots fan, I have a lot of rules for myself. I won’t have any player on my team who’s in the same division as the Patriots, and in any particular week, if one of my players is on the team playing the Patriots, I sit him. I won’t put myself in the position of rooting for a player against my Patriots.

So of course, when the idea was floated of a crafty football blog hop among crafty fantasy football league members, I knew I’d be doing something Patriots related, and I decided to share a tutorial on how to make and use freezer paper stencils. I generally create these stencils from my own designs; I’ve used the Patriots logo here in keeping with the blog hop theme. You cannot use a licensed logo on any item you plan to sell. Honestly, I’m hoping if anybody from the Patriots organization happens upon this tutorial, they see it for what it is (fan devotion) and don’t sue me. I like to think Mr. Kraft has sympathy for the common man…

How To: Freezer Paper Stencils at amyhoodarts.com

Materials: Freezer paper (look in the supermarket in the aisle with foil and plastic wrap); scissors; craft knife; masking tape; source sketch for design; cutting mat; iron; item to be stenciled; fabric paint (see below); paint brush

How To: Freezer Paper Stencil at amyhoodarts.com

Materials for cutting the stencil.

Every stencil begins with a source design drawn on regular paper at the final desired size. I like to measure the paper to fit the item I’m stenciling (in this case a tote bag purchased at the craft store) so I know my design fills the space the way I want it to.

How To: Freezer Paper Stencils at amyhoodarts.com

Source sketch of design, with colors written in for reference.

The next step is to cut a piece of freezer paper a little bigger than your source design so you have plenty of  margin around the edges. Tape your design to your surface so it doesn’t move; tape the freezer paper over it, shiny side down. Trace your image onto the papery side of the freezer paper.

How To: Freezer Paper Stencils at amyhoodarts.com

Now it’s time to cut out your stencil. Be precise and cut only on the lines. I use an x-acto knife for this. If the design has lots of straight edges (like this design that incorporates a star), I’ll use a steel ruler as a guide for those lines. Just make sure you stop right at the intersection of the lines; don’t cut over. You’ll be painting into the open spot, so you want the edges to be as clean as possible.

How To: Freezer Paper Stencils at amyhoodarts.com

Turn the paper as necessary so the cutting motion is as smooth and easy as possible. Avoid awkwardness! This design has two “floating” pieces, the star and the face, which need to be ironed on into the middle of the open area. If your design has floating areas, you need to cut those precisely as well.

How To: Freezer Paper Stencils at amyhoodarts.com

Once the stencil is cut, it’s time to iron it onto your item. The shiny side of the freezer paper will iron onto fabric firmly, yet also peels right off without residue. It’s really amazing stuff. Iron the surface of your item first to make sure it’s free of wrinkles, position your stencil where you want it, and iron away. Pay careful attention to the inside edges, where you’ll be applying paint. You want those firmly affixed so no paint bleeds under them. I usually stencil t-shirts; this is the first time I’ve tried a tote bag, and the surface is a bit more textured. You’ll see below where I didn’t get a few edges as closely adhered as I should have. Live and learn.

Because this design has those floating pieces, after I ironed on the outside piece, I fit the inside piece (which I’ll need later, too) without ironing it down, then placed the floating pieces inside, like puzzle pieces. I kept my finger on them while lifting off the inside piece, then ironed the floaters in place.

How To: Freezer Paper Stencils at amyhoodarts.com

Proper positioning of the floating pieces.

The completely ironed on stencil looks like this for the first paint layer:

How To: Freezer Paper Stencils at amyhoodarts.com

I typically use Speedball Screen Printing Ink for my stencils. I like the smooth look and the basic colors. It’s heat set, and it’s worn on our shirts well, although overly thick layers will crack a bit in the dryer. However, I needed silver for part of this design, and I don’t have that in the screen printing ink, so I used a little liquid acrylic paint as well. This is the kind of acrylic paint sold extremely cheaply in big-box craft stores, and it won’t wash out once it’s dry. It’s great for use on fabric, easy to find, and a fine alternative to screen printing ink for these stencils.

How To: Freezer Paper Stencils at amyhoodarts.com

Materials for painting.

For this first paint application, I’m using red and blue.

How To: Freezer Paper Stencils at amyhoodarts.com

Once those colors are dry, I can peel off all three pieces I’ve ironed on. For the small floating pieces, the edges of which are covered with paint, tweezers are helpful . These colors need to be heat set, so that’s the next step. Follow the directions on whatever paint you’re using.

How To: Freezer Paper Stencils at amyhoodarts.com

Notice the slight bleed in a couple of places on the red stripes and one spot on the blue. I should have ironed a bit more firmly in those spots.

I still need to paint the face silver, however. Remember that other inside piece I said I’d need later? I matched it up to cover the blue paint and ironed it down, again paying attention to those edges. Now I can paint the exposed face silver.

How To: Freezer Paper Stencils at amyhoodarts.com

After letting it dry, I carefully removed the final stencil and put my knitting inside the bag. Ready to watch some football and knit!

How To: Freezer Paper Stencils at amyhoodarts.com

Be sure to visit the rest of the blog hop participants for more crafty football ideas!


A Birthday Shirt and Cape

I’ve been quiet here because I was busy last week getting ready for my youngest child’s fifth birthday. For her third birthday, I surprised her with a white t-shirt with her number and a crown painted in pink, and now a new shirt is expected every time her number changes. Last year’s shirt was purple with a light blue number and crown, and this year’s is pink with a black number and crown. Of course she wore it on the big day itself.

five

I made it using a freezer paper stencil, which is so easy, with such satisfying results. I’ve been using them for years now, and I’m working on a tutorial for a blog hop I’m participating in on Thursday with other members of my fantasy football league. (I’m a woman of varied interests!) So look for that.

She is also wearing her new wizard cape, which is technically for Halloween, but she really, really wanted it in time for her birthday. She and her brother picked out Halloween decorations for her party, and Halloween plates, and she wanted people to wear costumes, and she wanted her wizard cape. Four years ago, when she was just a wee baby who wouldn’t sleep without me, I agreed to sew each of the boys special capes–my younger son has one just like the one you see here, except it’s white (he was a ghost), and my older son had a wizardy one with stars and moons on the fabric and big drapey sleeves. I drove myself into several meltdowns trying to sew slippery fabric around the schedule of a clingy baby, plus I’d only been sewing for a year, which means I’d sewn as much as possible for a month before having the baby, then barely sewed at all, then made those two capes. (After that, my husband banned me from sewing Halloween costumes.)

But this year, four years later…I know so much more. I made this cape with French seams, so the raw edges wouldn’t fray and unravel like they’ve done in my son’s, because patterns never do tell you what to do about those raw edges, they just figure you know, and I didn’t. The fabric didn’t seem at all unmanageable, I gathered the hood as instructed (I don’t think I even attempted it last time), and I turned the narrow hems with no trouble at all. It took a goodly bit of time to sew, of course, but that’s all it took–time. It didn’t take anything else out of me. As I sewed the pattern pieces together multiple times (because of the French seams) and watched my seams line up and everything come together smoothly, I kept thinking, I have come so far! That’s a nice feeling, and a pretty good bonus that comes from making the same pattern four years later. As my daughter twirled around in her cape, pretending to fly, I sat on the couch watching her and couldn’t help saying, “I did such a beautiful job making your cape.”

Freezer-Paper Stencil Birthday Shirt

We have a nephew turning five this weekend (whose favorite color happens to be green), so top of my to-do list upon returning home was to make him a special shirt. This process will never get old, I don’t think. It’s so much fun and the results are so pleasing. The paint application is a little uneven on this (there I go, being a perfectionist again)–it’s a little tricky on the colored t-shirts to get good coverage without applying overmuch paint, which could lead to cracking later on. So I decided a little unevenness was better than possible cracking. But shoving that aside, I think this shirt is adorable. My kids all approved (and none of them commented on any uneven paint application, either), so I hope our nephew likes it too.

I’m teaching a local workshop on this in December for ages 8-13 (see the classes page)…it’s a great technique for making gifts!

Weekend Making Session

I certainly didn’t intend for an entire week to go by in between posts, especially since I’ve actually been creating and making lately. I’m working on a February Baby Sweater for one of my husband’s co-workers, who is due at the end of this month. This is what it looked like this weekend, when I was knitting on my deck.

I’m much farther along now. Yarn and needle details are here. Unfortunately the yarn, a cotton/linen blend, is discontinued. I made my daughter and myself matching sweaters from it, and I wear my version all the time. The yarn has worn well and the sweater has gotten more and more comfortable, as linen does. And the yarn itself was extremely affordable.

Also this past week I finally got back to carving stamps and cutting fabric for new zippered pockets. Then, Sunday afternoon, I kicked everybody out of the house asked my husband to take the kids on an outing (he took them rock climbing at a new, local indoor facility) so I could get some work done. The house to myself! What an uncommon occurrence. I turned my music up loud and got to work. I took pictures as I went along this week so that I could use them on my shop about page–and share them here, too, of course.

I cut a bunch of fabric earlier in the week–most of what you see here will become plain, unadorned pockets. They’re pinned and ready for sewing.

This crab stamp, carved earlier in the week, is ready to be printed. It eventually became this pouch. I had a hard time listing that one. I love it, and I love its cousin with the sailboat patch too.

This is a photo in the midst of a stamping session. Once the ink has completely dried–I leave it overnight just to be sure–I heat set it. This labyrinth-stamped panel became this labyrinth pouch:

labyrinth 1

(click on the photo to go to the listing, if you are so inclined)

Sunday afternoon I pinned and sewed with no interruptions or distractions. It was wonderful! I still have that pile of plain pockets to get to during my next sewing session, and several panels waiting to be embroidered. And, of course, a baby sweater to finish and another one to start (for a baby due in October). It feels so good to get that making groove back again.

Summer T-Shirt Round-Up

Decorating our own t-shirts is a summer staple here. These range from simple (printing with leaves) to more complicated. I’ve gathered up the ones I’ve posted about here, in case you’re looking for ideas.

glue batik

Several years ago we each designed and decorated our own t-shirts using a glue batik process. I posted about it at Kidoinfo here.

sun print shirts

We experimented with sun printing right on t-shirts, with variable success. We learned cheap watered down liquid acrylics worked best for this. The full post is here.

freezer paper stencil

A favorite technique that we’ve used over and over–freezer paper stencils. The shirt above still gets worn regularly and complimented. The full post is here.

scratch foam shirt

Because my daughter was a bit too young at the time to design her own freezer paper stencil shirt, I helped her print a shirt using scratch foam. Our full process is described here.

The kids and I haven’t yet discussed what this summer’s shirts might entail. We’ll keep you posted!

Learning Lino (+ Some Printing)

I’ve been carving stamps for a while now, and the natural next step seemed to be learning how to carve linocuts. I rather naively thought this would simply be a matter of learning how to carve a different material, but it’s more complicated than that. It’s a related but different visual language. Some of my more intricate stamps could work as linocuts, but in general, a linocut is more graphic, with the hand of the artist more visible. The goal in a stamp, generally, is a clean design. Linocuts have more depth, and that’s the best I can do at trying to describe how it’s different. My first attempt at linoleum wasn’t terrible, but it was hesitant. My lines were thin and few. Linocuts, I believe, thrive on boldness.

So, I did what I do when I want to learn something, and I ordered a book. The book suggested first making a sampler block, and that is such a wise suggestion it seemed obvious once I read it. One of the first things I made after learning to knit was a sampler (from Jacqueline Fee’s Sweater Workshop). Samplers are excellent first steps.

The book is Learning Linocut by Susan Yeates, and the block was divided into six squares. I used each of my five blades in one square each, and then combined them in the final square. The idea is to see what the blades can do. With stamp carving, I’m trying to get a nice smooth line without tearing the carving material. Because lino is firmer, it’s possible to use the blades a little differently, scooping or twisting for different effects and textures.

I also learned it’s hard to take a test print on regular paper; I needed to use actual printmaking paper for a decent print.

I’m looking forward to trying to get better with this art form. It requires a different way of thinking about the final image. I like that it’s a challenge; that means I’ll (hopefully) be able to see my improvement as I keep at it.

The lino print was created at the end of a session which began with textile ink and fabric stamping and then moved into stamping some plain Kraft Moleskine notebooks. I ordered a set of three of these with the intention of decorating the covers myself. On one, I stamped my tree inspired by the Duncan Scarf at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum.

I then added color with colored pencils.

I am very happy with how this turned out. I’m using this notebook to collect the random quotes and phrases that I enjoy–often for no particular reason than I like the way the words flow.

On a second notebook, I printed my labyrinth stamp.

I then added lettering, because this is intended to be a gratitude notebook.

In the same order as the linocut book, I received Creative Lettering by Jenny Doh. I’d like to get better with my lettering, too.

I wasn’t sure what to do with the third notebook, so I left it for now. When it becomes clear what it should be, I’ll know. Meanwhile, it was good to have some time to work on my own ideas, finally. It makes me feel better able to attend to everybody else’s needs here.

{PBL} Give a Goat Project

g's goat cards

Several years ago, blogger Teabird sent us her review copy of the book Give a Goat. I read it to the boys right away, and it now sits on one of our storybook shelves. Periodically my daughter chooses it as part of her bedtime stories. Not too long ago, after hearing it again, she decided she, too, would like to give a goat through Heifer International. We talked about different ways she, at age four, could earn some money, and she began earning quarters every time she helped set the table, fold laundry, or clean the bathroom sink. (Normally I don’t pay for routine helping-out-type chores, but she’s four. Her earning options are limited.) However, a goat costs $120. We brainstormed some more.

Eventually she decided she would like to make note cards with a drawing of a goat on them, so we Googled for images of goats and she picked some for me to print out. Then, she drew some pictures of goats, using her reference images. Finally, she picked out two of her drawings (a mama and a baby, she told me), and together, we turned them into stamps.

Her goats are smiling because they are happy. Of course! Next, she picked out colors of card stock and ink, and we set to work printing.

Here’s a closer look at the mama goat:

And the baby goat:

When the cards were dry, she counted out six envelopes to go with her bundles of six cards, I wrote out a tag to her specifications, she signed the tag, and we bundled the cards and envelopes with pretty ribbon.

g's goat cards (2)

She settled on $5 for a package of six cards, and we began by emailing family members. Her next step is to brainstorm other places that might agree to sell them as well. Meanwhile, her dad gave her all his dimes, nickels, and quarters for her Give a Goat bank, and she and her 8yo brother sorted the coins; then he counted, added them up, and let her know she had just over $10 towards her goal.

So much going on with this project. So much!