Category Archives: printmaking

Art Quiltlet: 42/52

surface pattern art quiltlet at amyhoodarts.com

This was completed almost at deadline on Saturday because I’ve been so focused on sewing my daughter a pioneer outfit. But I did begin working on it earlier in the week, when I inexplicably received a free pen in the mail from some company that thinks I’m a company that might want to order pens. It came overly packaged in a plastic thing with bumps on it. I save things like that because they’re useful for printmaking. I decided to discharge with it first, though. I squirted bleach gel on top of all the bumps, lay a piece of fabric on top, and weighted it with glass. I left it while I did other things (sew on a pioneer dress, most likely), then rinsed out the bleach and let it dry. It’s hard to see in a photo, but the bleach created the yellowish circles.

I thought about leaving it that way, but then I decided to flip the plastic thing over and brayer it with red printmaking ink.

printing with found materials at amyhoodarts.com

That shows you what the mysterious plastic thing looks like! Plus you get a better look at the bleached areas. I liked all those triangles.

Once that dried, I decided to intersperse some solid areas and do some free-motion quilting, because I haven’t done any in a while and it seems like a skill that shouldn’t be allowed to get too rusty. It feels like I haven’t had time to get really in depth with these small pieces lately, but I try not to feel bad about that, as they’re first and foremost creativity boosters and play/experimentation time.

Sewn: Musette Bags

musette bags at amyhoodarts.com

These have been completed for a while, but I needed someone to help me with pictures and I kept forgetting to ask. I had the idea to make a musette bag while watching the Tour de France, of course, in July. Musette bags are the lightweight bags handed to the riders, containing their food. They’re not intended to hold anything terribly heavy, yet I wanted one anyway, because why not? As I am wont to do, I added a layer of complication by deciding that I needed to draw and carve a lino block bicycle so I could print it on the bags. So that took some time.

bicycle linoprint at amyhoodarts.com

Close-up of the bicycle linoprint. I used my husband’s bike as the model.

These are made out of utility cotton I found at Joann’s. It’s sturdy. The straps are twill tape, and I bought snaps and a snap setter from snapsource.com. I highly recommend them; installation was so much easier and smoother than trying to use the plier-type tool sold at craft stores.

musette bag at amyhoodarts.com

In the above picture I have an 8×10″ sketchbook and a pencil pouch in the bag; it’s sturdy enough for art supplies, which is probably what I’d use it for. It’s designed to cross the body.

musette bag at amyhoodarts.com

(Don’t judge the hair; it’s still so humid here and I was having an I-don’t-care sort of day.)

I love these bags. I have no use for more than one and am happy to sell or make one with a different color print or with a different print altogether. These have French seams, so no raw edges. They’re simple, as I said, with no interior pockets and a snap closure. I think their simplicity makes me love them more. That, plus it’s always satisfying to go, “I need to make X,” and then do it, and have it come out the way you wanted.

Art Quiltlet: 36/52

I swear I have other stuff going on besides these quiltlets, which I have such good intentions of posting about, and then the week goes by in a whooosh! of driving kids to schools and bus stops and picking them up again and cooking and packing lunches and cleaning and eking out some time to actually sew or read before falling asleep drooling at a ridiculously early hour most nights. But! I’m keeping up on quiltlets. Sometimes I finish one and immediately think, This one has to go bigger, too. Like, for instance, when I finished this week’s.

Symbols art quiltlet at amyhoodarts.com

I took photos as I went with this one, because I knew it was going to be a multi-step process. First I added color to white fabric using Neocolor II water-soluble pastels; they went on dry, then I wet with a brush.

painted fabric amyhoodarts.com

While that dried, I made a foam printing plate. But scratch foam printing results in a block of paint with the scratched-out part allowing the paper (or fabric, in this case) to show through. I decided I wanted more of the fabric visible, so I decided to cut a stencil out of freezer paper. I drew this free-hand, not terribly worried about getting everything exactly even or all the shapes the same size. Here’s the stencil ironed onto the fabric.

freezer paper stencil amyhoodarts.com

Then I painted it black, let it dry, and heat-set the ink. After peeling off the stencil, I had this:

freezer paper stencil amyhoodarts.com

Finally, I added the white geometric stitching, cropped, and finished. As I was stitching, my husband walked by and said, “I like that fabric.”

“I made it!” I said. And how cool is that? I really need to finish gathering the dyeing and batik supplies. That’s one of my goals for September–to have everything I need by the end of the month. Another is to freshen up this site a bit. And post a little more. Goals are good, hmm?

Art Quiltlet: 33/52

Leaf art quiltlet at amyhoodarts.com

Earlier in the week I saw this photograph come across my Instagram feed, and I liked it quite a bit. It stuck in my head, and definitely inspired last week’s quiltlet (completed on Saturday, just posted late). This quiltlet uses several techniques, and I like that I’m getting more comfortable mixing different methods. It’s also great to have expanded my technique toolbox, so to speak, so I have more options and a better likelihood of portraying something the way I see it in my head.

The top of this piece is composed of three layers. I wanted a lighter value green than any I had in stash, so I took a white piece of fabric and used Neocolor II watersoluble pastels on it, then sprayed with water and brushed to blend. The green is the middle layer, with the coral on the bottom and the purple on top. I stitched the leaf and then ripped away the fabric around it using the stitch and slash method, except I used scissors in places for a cleaner edge and I trimmed the green close on the outside edge rather than letting it show. Then I printed the coral with stripes of darker pink paint. After making a quilt sandwich, I free-motion stitched around them, cropped, and zigzagged the edges.

Leaf art quiltlet, detail, at amyhoodarts.com

Leaf art quiltlet, detail

This came out about how I’d hoped, and was a fun bit of play on a Saturday afternoon. I need to bring my sewing machine in for service on Monday–I have thread tangled around the tension discs and it’s not something I can remedy at home (it’s overdue for a cleaning anyway). Depending on how long they keep it, I may be doing this week’s quiltlet entirely by hand. I could borrow my daughter’s Hello Kitty machine–but there is something appealing about adding another layer of challenge.

Art Quiltlet: 31/52

Patterns

This one is simple and slow. First I carved a two-inch pinwheel quilt block stamp, which I then block printed on some fabric I dyed in a class a few weeks ago. I also dyed some thread in that class as an experiment, so I used it to outline on the diagonal by hand. Then I cropped and finished the edges. It’s simple, but satisfying. And I enjoy hand-stitching. I stitched this while watching the Olympic opening ceremonies with kids who wouldn’t stop talking.

So, I did finish this on time–it was completed Saturday morning–but the weekend was busy so I’m posting it now. Thirty-one weeks in and I’m still on schedule with making one each week.

Patterns quiltlet detail at amyhoodarts.com

Experiments

I’m trying to work on something every day, and one day last week I was at a loss, so I just started stitching fabric together. A whole bunch of blues, because I somehow have more blue fabric than any other color. Not surprisingly, it began to remind me of the ocean. I experimented with free-motion stitching on just the fabric (versus a “quilt sandwich” of fabric, batting, and backing) to see what happened. It puckers the fabric a bit more, is what, even if you’re careful. So it gets texture-y. I added some paint after carving a quick wave-like stamp. I decided it needed a girl doing a cartwheel. She was happy to be back at the beach.

She missed the ocean at amyhoodarts.com

“She missed the ocean”

It might be a little bit busy… and you can see how the fabric doesn’t lay completely flat. Do I like that? Or do I mind that? I’m deciding. I’m experimenting. I stitched some words, too.

She missed the ocean, detail. amyhoodarts.com

I really liked this cartwheel girl.

She missed the ocean, detail, amyhoodarts.com

I wondered what she’d look like cropped all the way down so she was the main focus, so I made another, smaller, piece, this time in a meadow full of flowers.

JOY at amyhoodarts.com

“JOY”

This one is only about 4×6″.  And while I typically like to work, then crop down, next time I’m using French knots I’ll crop first, then add the French knots, just because they get in the way a little bit on the edges. Ah, but check out her hair! All of it, really–I like it a lot. Doing creates ideas and those ideas create more ideas. There is always something new to try when I’m feeling a little stuck.

Art Quiltlet: 21/52

art quiltlet at amyhoodarts.com

I am making so very much that doesn’t get posted here, although most of it gets shared on Instagram. This quiltlet uses another piece of gelli-plate-printed fabric from last Monday’s printing session. I wasn’t happy with the way this print turned out (that blue shadow around the plant is because I didn’t get enough of the paint off on the first print with paper), so I decided to use it as practice, filling in the space with free-motion pebbling. Here’s what it looked like before I cropped it.

leaf print + texture before cropping, amyhoodarts.com

I would do things differently. I’d eliminate the outline stitching and just use pebbling. I ended up with some billowing in some of the leaves. And I’d make a better print to start. But this is why I like these low-risk quiltlets. It’s built in that I’m learning things and/or figuring things out as I go. Sometimes you don’t know what you like until you do something you don’t like. Not that I don’t like this piece; I just think it could be improved.

The back looks pretty cool too.

back of art quiltlet, amyhoodarts.com

It’s got me thinking about what I can do with negative space….

Art Quiltlet: 20/52

leaf print art quiltlet at amyhoodarts.com

I bought myself a Gelli Plate because while I love gelatin plate printmaking, I don’t have a place to store them here. Our fridge is side-by-side and flat shelf space is hard to find. So I decided to try the Gelli Plate and I wasn’t disappointed. It’s a good option. Monday I picked some plants, gathered some textures, and had myself a little printmaking session using fabric. This quiltlet came from that.

I felt like sitting down and stitching by hand yesterday, so I did. It’s been a week of Mondays and I wanted that quiet soothing-ness that comes from handwork. The result is pretty subtle. Kind of calm. Just what I needed.

This is week 20. Twenty! For week 10 I shared a picture of the first ten all together, so here’s a photo of quiltlets 11-20.

art quiltlets 11-20 at amyhoodarts.com

I like the variety. I like that I’m trying new things. I like how some of them very much reflect the week in which they were made, and some reflect how I was feeling (ready to tackle a new technique? or needing a bit of a respite?). I definitely like that I haven’t missed a week yet.

Art Quiltlets: 18 + 19/52

Again with the double post! I’m making weekly, just didn’t get a chance to post last week. I was busy working on a larger piece, which is actually where last week’s quiltlet came from. At the end of the week I looked at all the scraps on my work table, pulled some out, and collaged an art quiltlet.

Scraps art quiltlet at amyhoodarts.com

That white fabric with black printing wasn’t even used in the larger piece, in the end, but it found its way here. This was pure play, and it’s fun how many of the same elements turned into something so different than the piece from which they originated.

This week, I carved a stamp inspired by a book I found on the library shelf while browsing, Art Deco Textiles. Then I used it to make this little quiltlet.

Lepidoptera art quiltlet at amyhoodarts.com

The quiltlet itself is very simple. I’ve been in a frenzy of creating/sewing the past several weeks and I think I needed a little simple. But I like its quietness. Also, I really like carving stamps and I’m getting lots of inspiration from that book.

And now I am caught up on posting the quiltlets! I can’t believe we’re almost to week 20 of 2016.

Art Quiltlet: 10/52

Labyrinth art quiltlet at amyhoodarts.com

These small pieces are perfect for practicing or trying new things, and that’s what this week’s was mostly about. It began with one of my hand-carved stamps printed on linen, with the intention of tracing the labyrinth with metallic red thread. I learned that metallic thread isn’t worth the trouble–it kept breaking. Perhaps there’s some trick to it that I don’t know. Then I spent a while picking what felt like foil stitches out so I could start over with normal thread in a different color. I chose blue because I had matching backing fabric, and it was still bright. So, my free-motion stitching has gotten much, much better (I’ve been practicing; those pieces are all on Instagram), although I still need work on handwriting, so I added some words.

I always hand-stitch binding onto the back, but I decided to try machine stitching it. Ugh. I do not like that nearly as much. I’m not good at stitching in the ditch, which is part of it, but also I don’t like how I couldn’t control the neatness on the back like I can while hand-stitching. Good to know. If I make a quilt that I think needs machine stitching on the binding, I’m going to have to practice. In the meantime though, I so prefer hand-stitching, both doing it and the look of the final result.

Since this is the tenth week, I decided to photograph the quiltlets thus far all together. On a wrinkly white sheet of course.

ten art quiltlets at amyhoodarts.com

At the very least, I’ve kept it up for ten weeks in a row. And skills are improving, and it’s still fun. So, one-fifth (more or less) of the way through the year, this is still working for me.