Category Archives: painting

Paint Labs #4 and #11

I’m still working on the activities in Paint Lab, here and there. I full well know I have a problem focusing on just one area at a time. I’ve given up fighting it; I’ll just embrace it. So lots of things are always half done, and this month in particular it’s felt like I’ve been slogging along, mostly mired in my own head, spinning my wheels. I’ve been doing a lot of reading; dog days indeed. This also accounts for the quiet here. Days have been just sort of slipping by…

Anyway. I did paint lab #4, which involved acrylic glazing medium, a squeegee, and a canvas panel, a while ago.

paint lab #4 at amyhoodarts.com

Then I decided to add a couple of tree-ish things.

paint lab #4 with tree at amyhoodarts.com

I’m not sure about any of it, but these exercises are just that–exercises. Trying things out.

This week I did paint lab #11, “Masking Fluid Exploration,” in my sketchbook. I decided to use that day’s Spoonflower prompt, arrow, as the shape. I’ve done a few of the Spoonflower prompts; I’ve done more in my head, but as I said, August is like quicksand or something. I’m keeping track of them and I will pull them out for inspiration in the future even if I don’t get to them on the day they’re posted.

paint lab #11 at amyhoodarts.com

This was my first experimentation with proper masking fluid. I’ve heard all sorts of horror stories of destroyed paper and so on, but it peeled up easily. My sketchbook contains Strathmore 500 series mixed media paper, and I bought the Utrecht store brand of masking fluid last time we were there. Again, this was, as the lab title says, simply exploration. It will take more of it before I really get a feel for how it can be used beyond the obvious use of maintaining highlights.

I have more things and thoughts to share but we’ll have to see how long it takes given my apparent August torpor.

Watercolor Sketches + Shop Update

The final two watercolor sketches from last week. I only missed one day, Thursday, so I ended up with six total for the week.

watercolor sketch at amyhoodarts.com

watercolor sketch at amyhoodarts.com

I thought it would be fun to show the process, so I took photos along the way while making the strawberry sketch. I did this one Saturday evening, so the lighting isn’t the best. Before I share all those photos, though, I wanted to let you know that hand-stamped blank cards and lino prints and watercolors are now available in the shop. It took a bit of self-talk (and some encouraging talk by other people) to list the prints and watercolors. It feels different from the other products. They serve no purpose other than to hang on the wall; it’s a public declaration of my belief that my artwork is worthy of offering for sale. That’s not easy to do. (Which I only share because I think it’s better for all of us creative types if we admit when we feel a bit wobbly. Everybody does, you know.)

On to the strawberries.

still life set up at amyhoodarts.com

The still life set up.

initial pencil sketch at amyhoodarts.com

Initial pencil sketch.

traced over with ink at amyhoodarts.com

Traced over with ink (copic multiliner).

first wash of watercolor at amyhoodarts.com

First wash of watercolor.

more color added at amyhoodarts.com

More color added.

almost done at amyhoodarts.com

Almost done.

 

just needs to dry at amyhoodarts.com

Just needs to dry.

It takes a while to complete one because of the waiting time in between layers of color. If you add wet watercolors next to (or on top of) wet watercolor, it’ll bleed together. Sometimes that’s exactly what you want. Other times, it’s not, so it needs to dry first. You can see I have the paper taped down to a board (it’s a clipboard). I leave it that way until it dries. It helps keep it from curling too much.

In some ways this makes it a perfect type of painting for me to do. I’m always getting interrupted anyway. However, I’ve also gotten very good at telling the interrupter that I’m drawing/painting and I’ll get to them in a few minutes. All of my kids are old enough for me to be able to do this, generally. And they all respect the process, for the most part.

Two More Watercolor Sketches

Tuesday’s sketch was of a flower through a magnifying loupe. I don’t know what kind of flower it is; it’s the sort that would be in the background of an arrangement, just a nondescript spray of yellow, nothing much…until you look at it closely. Then it’s a world of tiny yellow petals, sticky sap, delicate stems.

watercolor sketch at amyhoodarts.com

Wednesday’s sketch is of black-eyed Susans rescued from a local meadow–which is supposed to be open space managed by the town–right before it was mowed right to the ground. I’m so sad about this, and curious–it’s the wrong time of year for meadow mowing for management, so what are they doing? Town hall referred me to the head of the conservation commission, who hasn’t returned my message yet.

watercolor sketch at amyhoodarts.com

These flowers look very different from the ones I bought Sunday, so either I mis-identified those, or they’re a cultivated version as opposed to the wild ones. At any rate, I like these, with their protruding center and drooping petals, better. I loved drawing them.

I didn’t manage a sketch on Thursday. We spent six hours at the beach, some of that time with friends (yay!), and after dinner I went to the market, because it’s much easier to do it with just my 12yo than with all three children. But I have a picture of a feisty blue crab to share with you, found by my 10yo at the salt pond.

blue crab at amyhoodarts.com

I hope your week is ending on a good note! Enjoy the weekend!

Watercolor Sketches

I quietly–well, not so quietly anymore, since I’m saying so here–set myself the challenge of making a watercolor sketch every day this week. I’m not sure I’ll make it, as we have a couple of long out-of-the-house days this week, including today, Tuesday. But I’ve completed two in a row, and that’s Something. Here’s the one I did Sunday, of a flower bought from the on-your-honor stand down the road, which I went to in the pouring rain because I wanted some flowers to draw. While I drew and painted, Ghostbusters was on in the background–the rest of the family was watching it. It was a nice way to spend a rainy Sunday afternoon.

watercolor sketch at amyhoodarts.com

5×7 watercolor sketch of a black-eyed Susan.

And this is the one I did Monday morning, while more or less leaving my kids to their own devices. My daughter drew and painted the flowers Monday morning as well, but she was almost done by the time I began. This flower wasn’t purchased; I found Turk’s-cap Lilies growing on the side of road next to the freshwater wetland, on the property that nobody wants to buy because it would be so hard to build on it. I love that wetland! And I was delighted to find these flowers. I snipped just two to take home with me.

watercolor sketch at amyhoodarts.com

5×7 watercolor sketch of Turk’s-cap Lilies.

These were difficult to draw, and I don’t think my hesitancy did me any favors. I may try this one again.

I am really enjoying my watercolors.

Postcard Idea: Found Poetry

Postcard Idea: Found Poetry at amyhoodarts.com

Suppose you want to participate in the summer postcard swap but you’re not sure what to do artistically? You could do something with words instead–such as found poetry.

To do this, first we looked through magazines, newspapers, and old books (the ones we have set aside for collage purposes) for interesting phrases that we liked. This is obviously easier for kids who can read, but my 5yo really wanted to join in, so I read phrases aloud to her and she cut out ones that she liked. But otherwise, let kids choose phrases they like themselves, with no in-between.

found poetry postcard at amyhoodarts.com

Background: Liquid watercolors.

When we had phrases, we created the backgrounds. These can be as simple or complex as you’d like. Most of the ones here just use watercolors.

found poetry postcard at amyhoodarts.com

Background: Ink doodles colored in with colored pencils.

I like to collect the phrases first and then arrange something from what I have, but my 12yo looked for phrases for a specific idea. There are no hard and fast rules here. The fun is in combining words that you didn’t find together to begin with.

found poetry postcard at amyhoodarts.com

Background: Watercolor, with Sharpie pictures added after words were glued down.

My 5yo had me read all her cut-out phrases to her and then she arranged them according to some internal 5yo order. It came out sounding a bit like the Giant’s story in The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales–which is also a pretty fun outcome.

We used a glue stick to adhere our words to our postcards. The ones with watercolor backgrounds are on watercolor paper, and the one with a colored pencil background is on Bristol board. You could do this on a solid color background, too…use whatever is on hand.

Have you started working on postcards yet? Share your thoughts/ideas in the comments, or add photos in progress to the Art Together Flickr group. And don’t forget to spread the word about the swap–the more the merrier!

Paint Lab #8: The Golden Ratio

I’m continuing with my out-of-order Paint Lab exercises (first post on this project is here). Lab #8 is inspired by the Fibonacci sequence. Fibonacci was a pretty cool guy. Earlier this year my kids and I read about him in Blockhead: The Life of Fibonacci, after encountering him in the first Story of Science book by Joy Hakim. I already knew of the Fibonacci sequence, but I learned more about the man and his other contributions.

Anyway. This exercise has you use examples of the sequence, graphically displayed. I did these in my sketchbook. I printed the images out, rubbed the back of the paper with a graphite stick, then traced the image on the front to transfer the lines. Yep, it took some time. (But, making my own carbon paper in that way always makes me feel a wee bit clever.)

Paint Lab #8 at amyhoodarts.com

For this first one, I used watercolor pencils, wetting the tips before touching them to the paper. This is not hard stuff here–but it was pretty calming. Like a grown-up coloring book.

Paint Lab #8 at amyhoodarts.com

For the second one I used watercolors, going for mostly an earthy palette. I mixed some brown into my blues and greens.

The Golden Ratio as it’s related to art is an interesting thing to Google–so much information, so many examples! Do it if you have some time.

Working My Way Through Paint Lab

{Jen has a review and giveaway of Art Together Issue Four: Mixed Media. Leave her a comment by Saturday for a chance to win–and go check out what she has to say!}

I bought myself a present recently–my own copy (versus the library copy) of Paint Lab: 52 Exercises Inspired by Artists, Materials, Time, Place, and Method, by Deborah Forman. I have some other books in the Lab Series, but this one has so many exercises I want to try that I decided to make a list and work my way through them. I’m not going in order–I’ll go back to skipped ones when I get the materials I’m lacking. For instance, Lab 4 requires glazing medium, and I don’t have any.

I’ve completed two and started a third, though, and I’m enjoying the exercise-ness of them. They remind me of art class assignments. It’s very much just working things out. I think maybe framing something as an exercise lets me sink into it in a different way. Sometimes I am playing around with technique or method while I’m art-making. Sometimes I’m trying to achieve a specific design or image. And with exercises it’s a bit of problem-solving within a framework. These different ways of working engage different parts of my brain. I remember enjoying my design class exercises in college, and these remind me of those in some ways.

Paint Lab #1 at amyhoodarts.com

Paint Lab #1

This is layers of watercolor. All those dots? Pretty meditative. Not boring to do at all.

For Lab #5, Forman suggested doing the same design (created by collage first, then transferred) in two different color schemes. I also used two different types of paint and paper. The results are very different. In this first version, I used acrylic paint on canvas paper. I decided to use red, yellow, white, and green. Red and yellow are both warm colors, and green is red’s complement (it lies across it on the color wheel).

Paint Lab #5 at amyhoodarts.com

Paint Lab #5, version 1.

For the second version, I used watercolors on watercolor paper. I used the analagous colors of blue, blue-green, and green, with orange, which is blue’s complement.

Paint Lab #5 at amyhoodarts.com

Paint Lab #5 version 2.

I’ll keep posting these exercises as I do them. If anybody else has a copy of Paint Lab and wants to join in, please feel free to share links to posts or photos. It would be pretty cool to find others who have or who are working their way through the book, too.

Creating Every Day

Without really thinking about it or planning it out, I’ve been creating every day. It’s wonderful. The kids and I have been immersing ourselves in trying out ideas for the next issue of Art Together, which focuses on mixed media and collage. Here’s a sneak peek of the title.

mixed media title at amyhoodarts.com

The featured artist this issue is Joseph Cornell, and I’ve just finished reading a nearly 400-page biography on him. I suppose this is a bit more than I have to do in order to include him in the zine, but I like biographies, and going that deep certainly doesn’t hurt. The kids have enjoyed learning more about him and his artwork as well. Issue Four will be available in June, as close to June 1 as I can make it.

Along with making art with the kids, I’ve been making art for the upcoming fair.

items ready for the fair at amyhoodarts.com

This is what I have beyond the sewn pouches. I have just a few matted linocut prints, on the left. I have a half dozen stamped small Moleskine notebooks, and below those, a sampling of hand-printed or -stamped cards. The white ones are mixed media cards and work well with the linocuts; the brown ones are kraft cardstock, so I used my stamps on those. I have about ten of each. At the bottom right are large stamped Moleskines, and above those is a box of rocks.

box of painted rocks at amyhoodarts.com

I kind of just like saying “box of rocks!”

In between the making I’ve been writing–a draft of an article for Home/School/Life, and the zine too, of course. It’s a good sort of busy, with all this creating going on, and with enough variety that I can switch between different sorts of creative muscles. And of course, any day that includes art-making and creating is automatically a Very Good Day.

Craft Fair Announcement + Some Making

For those of you who are local, I’ll have a table at The Compass School’s Eco-Fair. Relevant info is on this flyer.

The Compass School Eco Fair flyer at amyhoodarts.com

I’ll be selling zippered pockets, of course, along with stamped Moleskines, stamped/printed blank cards, and possibly some matted prints. I sewed quite a few pockets last month, so this past week I’ve been busy with other things.

bunting + stamped notebooks at amyhoodarts.com

Up top is a portion of a bunting I stamped and sewed. It has eight of those triangles altogether, each with a different summery stamp. This is ultimately for the slider in our dining room, which right now is decorated with felt spring flowers on a crocheted vine. I like to change it up seasonally, but last year those flowers stayed up all summer. But I’m also going to use this to decorate my table at the fair.

Below are some small stamped Moleskines. I carved the house stamp a while ago but I don’t think I ever shared it, so here’s a close-up.

hand-carved house stamp at amyhoodarts.com

Finally, I’ve been painting rocks. I thought it would be nice to have some low-priced items that might appeal to kids, since it’s a school fair. These aren’t quite done yet. They’ll all get a coat of gloss acrylic varnish.

painted rocks at amyhoodarts.com

I’m not quite sure what to charge for these. Materials cost next to nothing, but of course they do take time (and very, very tiny brushes). Any ideas?

Poem in Your Pocket Day

Today is Poem in Your Pocket Day, part of National Poetry Month, and I have a couple of poetry-related things to share with you. Firstly, we visited the Carle Museum earlier this week, and their art studio activity was, fittingly enough, illustrating a favorite poem using watercolors. This is one of my 9yo’s paintings:

butter butter butter butter at amyhoodarts.com

9yo’s illustration of Karla Kuskin‘s poem.

I love the looseness of his butter here. It’s a great illustration of butter! It’s also a favorite poem of ours and one we recite quite often, because…butter.

As for the poem I’d like to share with you…I recently finished reading E. E. Cummings: A Life, by Susan Cheever, so here is a really lovely stanza from his poem my father moved through dooms of love–but I hope you also click through to read the entire poem:

My father moved through theys of we,
singing each new leaf out of each tree
(and every child was sure that spring
danced when she heard my father sing)

Happy Poem in Your Pocket Day, everyone.