Category Archives: free resources

Animal Classification: Reptiles

Reptile page, all filled in.

Reptile page, all filled in.

{Previous posts in this series: Animal Classification BookletAnimal Classification: Mammals + FishAnimal Classification: Birds; Animal Classification: Amphibians.}

Phew, the last post in this series. We finished up our five-part animal classification class for ages 5-8 at co-op this past week. Because this was the last class, it included some review of all five groups.

Resources:
Reptile poster from Verterbrate Teaching Poster Set
Various books on reptiles, including ID guide
Snake shed (not necessary, but I happened to have one)
Large (18×24″) chart to fill in with the kids. List the five types of vertebrates down the left side and create five columns with the following headings: How it breathes; Body covering; Eggs or born alive; Warm- or cold-blooded; Distinctive characteristic.

Activity:
Sniffers activity at Reptiles Alive
(Note: I used citronella as one of my essential oils and I do not recommend it! It sort of overpowered all the other scents.)

Handout:
Reptile word search found via Google
Completed Animal Classification booklets

We began by listing the groups we’ve already talked about, and the kids identified which group (reptiles) was left. As a group, we listed what we knew about reptiles, and then I hung the poster for discussion. Since we have snakes that live in our yard and I happened to have a complete snake shed we found in the yard several years ago, I brought it in to share. We tried the sniffing activity–it worked well enough but would have worked better if I’d avoided the citronella–and then we discussed how snakes use their tongues to pick up scents and why animals might need a good sense of smell.

After the kids filled in the reptile page in their booklets, I hung up the large chart and we filled it in together. The best part of class for me, I think, occurred when one child was working on the matching activity on the back page of the booklet and was stumped by kangaroo. Instead of telling him the answer, another child helped him figure it out on his own: “Kangaroos have fur. There’s only one group with fur, do you remember which one?” Witnessing the point at which someone feels confident enough in what they’ve learned to help teach it to somebody else–that’s just awesome.

We were limited by time (50-minute sessions) and space (no field trips, just a classroom experience), but I think we managed some great learning-together sessions. I hope you find these posts a useful starting point if you decide to plan something similar at home or in a co-op.

Animal Classification: Amphibians

{Previous posts in this series: Animal Classification Booklet; Animal Classification: Mammals + Fish; Animal Classification: Birds.}

amphibian page, filled in

amphibian page, filled in

I find the common practice of discussing reptiles and amphibians together both annoying and mystifying. They are wholly separate groups of vertebrates. There is perhaps a superficial resemblance, in that some salamanders (amphibians) remind people of lizards (reptiles). That’s my best guess. They are nothing alike. Lumping them together only leads people to confuse the two groups. So of course I am addressing them separately for my co-op class.

Resources:
Amphibian/Reptile poster from Vertebrate Teaching Poster set, folded over so only amphibian portion is visible
Assorted books on amphibians
Life cycle of a frog sheets

Activity:
From Polliwog to Frog: Association of Zoos and Aquariums
Frog sounds, using an Identiflyer; you could probably also search for an app that would supply amphibian sounds

Handouts:
Word searches, found through Google

We began by talking about what we knew of amphibians, making sure to discuss the most important characteristic, their metamorphosis from aquatic creatures with gills as juveniles to adults that breathe with lungs and live on land. The session’s activity was craft-oriented, with coloring, cutting, and assembling; this is part of my desire to offer various types of activities. As with other classes, we discussed the information on the poster and wrote the group characteristics in the animal classification book.

In our final session (coming up), we’ll discuss reptiles and compare the characteristics of all five groups as a whole.

Animal Classification: Birds

Bird page from booklet with characteristics filled in.

Bird page from booklet with characteristics filled in.

(This is the third in a series of sorts…the PDF of the animal classification booklet can be found here. Teaching plan for Mammals and Fish can be found here.)

Resources:
Bird poster from Vertebrate Teaching Poster set
Assorted books on birds–the kids really enjoyed DK Eyewitness Books: Bird

Activity:
Birds, Beaks, and Adaptation: PDF activity found at the teacher resources page of the National Park Service’s Mississippi (Minnesota) National River and Recreation Area.

Handout:
Bird word search–Googling will bring up many choices. One of my students asked for a word search to bring home each week so I am trying to accommodate!

For our third session, I began by asking the kids what they knew about birds. I realized after the fish class that I need to do lots less talking with this group. They are so eager to share what they know, and they know plenty. We went around the group and everyone shared something about birds–they lay eggs, they have feathers, they fly, they have beaks, etc–and we compared those things to mammals and fish. This was a great way to review the previous two groups we’ve covered, especially since it had been two weeks (instead of one) since we last met. I only put up the poster after we’d discussed what we knew of bird characteristics, and we checked if we’d missed anything, and we had! We’d all forgotten about warm-blooded or cold-blooded, so we reviewed that too and then talked about the groups of birds shown on the poster.

While the kids wrote in their booklets, I set up for the beak adaptation activity. Early finishers looked through the selection of bird books I’d brought. Some of the youngest kids aren’t reading yet, but I noticed older kids explaining and reading the information–I love these opportunities that naturally arise in a mixed-age group.

We had eight kids in class, so I separated them into four pairs for the beak adaptation activity. Each group was given one tool and a recording sheet, and they went around the room trying their “beak” at the different “habitats.” More than one tool will work for some items, so I told them this and asked them to find the beak that worked best. When they’d finished, they traded tools with other groups so they could try more out.

It’s impossible in an hour to cover everything about a group of animals! But focusing on one area (beaks) through a hands-on activity worked really well.

Animal Classification: Mammals + Fish

As promised, to go along with the Animal Classification Booklet download, here are my plans and resources for the first two groups we talked about in co-op, mammals and fish. Again, this class is for ages 5-8.

mammals copy

Mammals page from the booklet, with characteristics filled in

In our first class, we covered mammals but began with the idea of classification itself, discussing the two big groups of animals (vertebrates and invertebrates) and how scientists make that first divide (by whether they have a backbone). We found our own backbones.

Resources:
Vertebrate Teaching Poster Set; I’m using the appropriate poster for each class, starting off our discussion of the group by talking about the information and animals on the poster.
What is a Vertebrate? by Bobbie Kalman, to have on hand for pictures and to refer to.

Activities:
Dichotomous key: We did this together, keying out most of the included animals, to show how scientists use differing characteristics to place animals in smaller and smaller groups until the species has been identified.
Mammal matching: Each student had a copy, but we did it together as a group. This demonstrates how mammals are divided into smaller groups.

We also filled in the pages of their books as a group, with each student writing in their own booklet.

Take-Home:
Mammal word search

Fish page from booklet with characteristics filled in

Fish page from booklet with characteristics filled in

We began our second session by reviewing the characteristics of mammals before moving onto fish. In this way we could compare the groups (which are very different!). Again, we discussed the poster and wrote in the booklets.

Resources:
What is a Fish? by Bobbie Kalman
Various field guides/books of fish

Activity:
Fashion a Fish from Aquatic Project Wild: I received my copy many, many years ago by going through the Project Wild and Aquatic Project Wild training; this remains the only way to obtain this curriculum. Google tells me some folks have scanned in this activity and posted it online, but you’ll have to search yourself, because I’d feel uncomfortable linking. However, that link above includes a link to the state coordinator page for this program. Training is, as far as I know, still free, and you get an entire book of resources for free, too.

Birds, reptiles, and amphibians will be upcoming as we cover them!

Animal Classification Booklet

Click to download PDF

Click to download PDF

Our winter session of homeschool co-op is just five weeks of classes, so I’m offering an animal classification class for ages 5-8. This is a really fun age group, very enthusiastic, and while it’s called “animal” it’s really vertebrate classification. We’re learning about one class of vertebrates–mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, and amphibians–each week.

I wanted something for the kids to write in and keep. (Some of the kids really like paperwork.) After hunting around on the Internets a little bit, I decided just to go ahead and make my own, which I’m now sharing with you, because, well, why not? What you see there is just the cover. It’s a PDF file designed to be printed landscape on regular printer paper so you can fold it into a booklet. Print pages 1 and 2 back to back, and pages 3 and 4 back to back. Assemble and fold together. Each page has room for the kids to write down the characteristics of that particular vertebrate, and the back cover has a little bit of matching. All the images are from the fantastic image library at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.

I also plan to share my full lesson plan with the activities and resources I’m using. Coming up: Mammals and Fish.