Category Archives: drawing

Drawing Practice

There’s no big mystery to drawing. It’s simply looking very closely with a pen or pencil in hand. Last week, Lori of Camp Creek Blog emailed out daily drawing prompts, but I saved them until this week when I could focus a little more. Many of the prompts are for items I’ve already drawn on my own or through one class or another, but sometimes it’s easier to just go draw what you’re told instead of looking around for something on your own. So I’m trying to, this week.

Day one was hands–first through blind contour, then contour.

Blind contour drawing of my left hand.

Blind contour drawing of my left hand.

Contour drawing of my left hand.

Contour drawing of my left hand.

The second prompt was to draw something from nature. I chose some skate egg cases.

Skate egg case drawing.

Skate egg case drawing.

And day three was to draw something from the kitchen. I chose a pair of tongs. I had some trouble with the rounded, toothed scoop part, especially on the left.

Kitchen tongs.

Kitchen tongs.

That’s the angle I drew it at, so that’s the angle I photographed it at.

I like drawing, and more drawing leads to better drawing, so I plan to finish out the week’s worth of prompts this week. So far none of the kids have sat down to draw next to me (this week), but after observing me drawing the tongs, my daughter went into her room with her sketchbook and drew her Hello Kitty jewelry box. All the kids already draw, though, some more often than others, from imagination and from observation.

Making + Listening::11/2014

Making this week…we had some sun, so we made sun prints. I pulled out our package–I keep it in the light-proof envelope it came in, inside the cardboard box it was shipped in, inside a closet (overprotecting, much?)–and saw the advice to use within six months of opening. I’m pretty sure we’ve had this package two years, but we gave it a try. Below you can see some of the sun prints on the old paper, which is smaller, versus the new paper I went out to buy that afternoon because somebody was a little disappointed.

sun prints (old paper vs new) at amyhoodarts.com

The blocked areas aren’t as bright white, but otherwise, it works. I like using sun prints in collages. Now that we know we have to use it all up this summer, we will.

N and G have been making maps, some in collaboration and others separately.

kid-drawn maps at amyhoodarts.com

Collaborative maps, mostly drawn by N with idea input by G.

kid-drawn map at amyhoodarts.com

One of G’s maps.

Unable to find the bleach pen I know I have somewhere (time to clean out the studio, perhaps?), I bought another one and played with some denim scraps that Jen gave me.

bleach pen on denim at amyhoodarts.com

As for listening, Tuesday night Jen and I got together and listened to each other–adult talk!–for a couple of hours. That was a treat and a joy.

Linking up with Jen again this week…

An Announcement or Two

sketching irises at amyhoodarts.com

G and I drawing and painting irises in the yard this weekend.

This is the day I’d planned to have Issue Four of Art Together available, despite spending half of March sick with a bad cold and losing a week in April to the flu. But last week I became sick again, and it turned out to be strep, and that was the last straw. So I requested a week extension from myself, and Myself listened, weighed the facts, and granted it. Mainly it’s just the tech stuff left to do, which does, in fact, require me to be conscious. I had no idea strep was more than just a bad sore throat! I could barely keep my eyes open for a while there, but antibiotics are lovely when you truly need them, aren’t they? Like magic.

Speaking of Issue Four, which focuses on mixed media + collage, if you’re interested in a review copy and/or giveaway, drop me a line at amyhood at amyhoodarts dot com and we’ll discuss.

And finally, if you’re in southern Rhode Island this summer, you can now find my pockets and cards in Thrifty Sister in Peace Dale. This is a great consignment store that also carries work by local artists. (It also happens to be an excellent source of interesting found paper for mixed media and collage.)

Circles: Sketchbook Page Inspired by G

Saturday morning, while not-waking-us-up-early, my 5yo drew a page of “Thomas wheels” (as in Thomas the Tank Engine).

5yo's page of circles at amyhoodarts.com

I love them. I love the vibrant color, the repetition of a theme, the way they’re all a little different. I love the way that, because she’s five, she doesn’t stress herself out to the point of paralysis with the idea that the circles should be perfectly circular. When I got a chance, I sat down with my sketchbook and drew some circles to color in, too. I told her she had inspired me.

circle sketchbook page at amyhoodarts.com

These were so much fun to draw and color. I like the equality that goes on, artwise, in my house. Ideas and techniques don’t just flow in one direction, from adult to children. We inspire each other. It’s a fabulous, natural way to nurture confidence and a willingness to try new things.

(I’ve added a few more sketchbook pages to my flickr sketchbook set.)

Making + Listening::9/2014

The Making + Listening series has a new host, Jen at iHappy, and I’m definitely happy to be joining in again this week! It’s been a while. I’ll start off by sharing something 5yo G made.

5yo's 3-D picture at amyhoodarts.com

This was all her idea and completely driven by her. As is usual, she let me know when she needed certain materials or some assistance. I did suggest she glue the paper that she colored onto some mat board before proceeding to glue things onto it, since she started off with printer paper. I love how kids simply don’t care about things like scale, and how their artwork is so much more interesting for it.

Here’s a close-up of the cow (cut from a milk carton) with the flowers (carefully constructed from paper and tissue paper before gluing to the base).

amyhoodarts.com

Those flowers tower over that cow. It’s awesome.

Another close-up, of the superhero:

amyhoodarts.com

I also helped her figure out how to glue that so it stayed upright. We used a craft stick for support. One more close-up, of the chimney on the building. She told me she needed a cap from a juice carton, brown paint, and black paper so she could cut out smoke.

amyhoodarts.com

I super love the things she makes.

In comparison, I’ve been downright slothful. I have a chicken-in-progress to share…

embroidered chicken in progress at amyhoodarts.com

I’m working on some more small embroidered linen pockets–I decided to apply for a proper craft fair being held in July.

As for the listening, I’m really enjoying the birds. The weather has finally cooperated enough that we can have the windows open during the day. I hear far more birds than I see, of course. Titmice and towhees, cardinals and catbirds, phoebes, veerys, wood thrush, and a yellow warbler that I really want to get a glimpse of, but I’ve had no luck so far. Varied birdsong in the summer is one of my favorite parts of where I live.

And while I wish I had a lilac bush right in my yard, on my way home yesterday I noticed cut lilac at the on-your-honor flower stand down my road, so I made a u-turn and bought some. Now my dining room smells perfect.

cut lilacs at amyhoodarts.com

 

Drawing Dragons

dragon drawings at amyhoodarts.com

Artwork by N. Hood.

Last week, my 9yo picked out a book on drawing dragons, Dragonart Evolution: How to Draw Everything Dragon, at the craft store. We got home and he began drawing. He’s barely stopped since.

dragon drawings at amyhoodarts.com

His new book and his stack of drawings–and he’s using both sides of the paper.

He began by attempting some of the drawing guidelines from the book, but he’s mainly using it for inspiration.

dragon drawings at amyhoodarts.com

artwork by N. Hood

Sometimes he focuses on a specific area, such as eyes or texture.

dragon drawings at amyhoodarts.com

artwork by N. Hood

His drawings have stories attached. Sometimes they contain text.

dragon drawings at amyhoodarts.com

artwork by N. Hood

If there’s a battle going on, he’s partial to the dragon’s side of the story.

dragon drawings at amyhoodarts.com

artwork by N. Hood

I asked if I could share some, and he said yes, but he had a hard time narrowing down the choices. In the end, I chose five out of his pile and he slipped in a couple more.

dragon drawings at amyhoodarts.com

artwork by N. Hood

I promised him we’d document all of them with photographs.

dragon drawings at amyhoodarts.com

artwork by N. Hood

He has said repeatedly that he loves the book. The book was just the starting point. He has drawn dragons before, many of them, but this book, I think, gave him some new things to think about. He’s going deeper, and he has spent hours drawing, every day, utterly absorbed and content–which makes me happy, too.

Sketchbook Skool So Far

in the style of Sendak at amyhoodarts.com

Sketching from Where the Wild Things Are to try on different styles.

We’re in Week Four (already!) of Sketchbook Skool. I signed up with the goal of using my sketchbook more and getting more out of it, and I think I am. My experiences with the instructors have been variable, but that’s to be expected, I think; different people have different styles and philosophies. I’m also at a different place in life than the instructors so far. They talk of how a sketchbook practice is easy to fit into a day, just 45 minutes to an hour! I’ve noticed that none of them are trying to draw while tending to the needs of a few kids. (To be fair, an hour of drawing would have been difficult on days I waitressed 12-hour shifts, too. These challenges aren’t confined to parents and I don’t mean to imply they are.) But as always, I work around my responsibilities and use the parts of the class that I can, as I can.

flowers sketchbook page at amyhoodarts.com

Remembering special days via the sketchbook.

The first two instructors, Danny Gregory and Koosje Koene, both suggested starting off with pen, not pencil. I completely understand that philosophy–pencil can cause you to draw small and tight, over-focused on the perfect line, erasing as you go. But I don’t like starting with pen, and I don’t draw small and tight with pencil. I’m looser, putting down multiple lines, zeroing in on the one I want. I often leave those other lines in the drawing, liking the way they add energy to it. I did my homework using only the pen, but it didn’t change my mind much. However, because of Danny’s class, I’m adding a bit more text to some of my drawings.

sneakers sketchbook page at amyhoodarts.com

Adding text to my drawing.

(An aside: One of his demonstrations was drawing breakfast before eating it. This really highlighted the different-place-in-life thing. I’ve gotten used to eating soggy cereal because morning is such a difficult time of day to sit for ten minutes straight to eat even that much. Imagine taking the time to draw your food before eating it! I’d end up with neither breakfast nor a drawing.)

fruit sketchbook page at amyhoodarts.com

Jane LaFazio’s homework assignment involved using a grid.

This week’s instructor, Jane LaFazio, uses pencil to start with. Hurrah! I really like her style. It resonates quite a bit–she also carves stamps and uses textiles and embroiders and paints. It’s probably no surprise that I enjoy her work.

sea shell study at amyhoodarts.com

I liked the homework so much I did it again with seashells.

I don’t get into the sketchbook every day, but I’m definitely having fun with it. Last night I spent several hours with those seashells, in between other tasks. We have two more weeks of Sketchbook Skool…I’m looking forward to seeing what the last two instructors have to offer.

I’m adding my sketchbook pages to a Flickr set, if you want to see more as I go on.

Halted

My sketchbook school assignment was to document my days. I didn't get far.

My sketchbook school assignment was to document my days. I didn’t get far.

While my husband was in Singapore we got something like five inches of rain in less than 24 hours. I worked to drain the pond in the driveway and keep the water away from the basement. When the French drains were overwhelmed, I set up a siphon with the garden hose to drain the water away from the foundation in that spot under the stairs where it collects. (I feel there should be some sort of merit badge for that.) We had some seepage but nothing more. The next day at school, my 12yo dropped a table on his foot. X-rays at urgent care showed a fracture; off to the orthopedist we all went, where my stomach turned as he pointed out the multiple fracture lines in my kid’s big toe. My husband came home for the weekend, and we were all so happy to see him, and then I came down with the flu, and then he left again, and that’s when everything really ground to a halt here.

Some trips are like that.

I’d meant to get quite a bit done while he was gone this past week. Sewing in the evenings, working on my Sketchbook Skool assignments and blogging about them, working on the next issue of Art Together. I am behind on everything. My world compressed to the couch, with brief forays off of it for the basic minimum, mainly, making sure my kids were fed. Here is what I know: I am glad my kids are older. It makes things much easier. They are all self-sufficient enough to get by when dad is traveling and mom has the flu. The first night, they got their own dinner–bagels mostly, I think, with the oldest making food for the youngest–while I napped on the couch. The next morning, the oldest got his younger sister breakfast before catching the bus. I did manage to slither off the couch and wait for the bus with him, sitting on a chair with a view out the garage door. (I like to see him get on the bus every morning.) The younger two played together with LEGO. The boys took turns reading bedtime stories to their sister. Gradually the bits of wakefulness between naps increased. We got through.

My house is a bit of a wreck (although dishes and laundry were dealt with). My to-do list, well, I can’t look directly at it. It’s more of a side-eye thing. I get winded walking up and down stairs; I’m not quite ready to tackle a to-do list full on. I might need a nap just to recover from writing this blog post. It’s always a bit of a miracle, though, emerging from that stripped-down survivalist mode, blinking into the light of day, newly grateful for lungs and energy and self-sufficient kids.

A Peek into my Sketchbook

I practice drawing in my sketchbook several times a week, although I’d like to make it more of a daily habit. (To that end, I’m signed up to take Sketchbook Skool beginning April 4, which is quickly approaching. Exciting!) Getting a glimpse into someone’s sketchbook is kind of a thrill. I borrowed Drawn In: A Peek into the Inspiring Sketchbooks of 44 Fine Artists, Illustrators, Graphic Designers, and Cartoonists from the library not too long ago and took my time with every page. People use their sketchbooks in so many ways. I still haven’t managed to keep everything in one place; I have ideas in my journaling notebook and in my project notebook as well, but I don’t seem to integrate words and images. I’d like to; it just doesn’t happen naturally.

At any rate, here are some recent pages from my sketchbook. I’ve been buying flowers at the supermarket every week, and I’m still buying them, because it’s not spring here yet. I try to draw them every week too. Here are a couple:

sketchbook lilies at amyhoodarts.com

sketchbook mum at amyhoodarts.com

I try to bring my sketchbook along when I leave the house, just in case. This one isn’t that big. While waiting for my daughter in gym class recently, I tried to do some gesture drawings.

sketchbook gesture drawings at amyhoodarts.com

This past weekend, I took two of the kids on a nature walk. The associated nature center has dioramas of different habitats. It’s so much easier to draw animals when they’re not moving!

sketchbook snowy egret at amyhoodarts.com

I’m not very good at drawing “from imagination,” for some reason. But I’d like to be better at it. I made a few sketches trying to capture some of what the worst of PTSD felt like to me.

PTSD sketch at amyhoodarts.com

sketchbook moth in jar at amyhoodarts.com

Sometimes ideas from my sketchbook evolve into more finished pieces (such as both the linocuts in this post), and I will often work out a specific design problem within its pages, too. I don’t really art journal, although I have some images that use paint.

If you have a sketchbook, how do you use it?

A wee bit of overwhelm

Lilies from the supermarket.

Lilies from the supermarket.

As we wind down January and head into February, I’m feeling a little…overwhelmed. I agreed to run some printmaking workshops over February school vacation. I want the third issue of Art Together complete by the end of February. I have a guest post due by the end of February, and a column due as well. My husband will be away for another full week. February is only 28 days long. It’s not looking nearly long enough right now. But these are good “problems” to have—many Good Things will be accomplished in February. Yes.

So, a column is exciting! But also a bit pressure-y in a way writing my own blog is not. A magazine that comes out four times a year doesn’t lend to an immediate conversation with the reader, so I’m left trying to anticipate what those readers might want most. I polled my family members: If you were a homeschooler or parent who maybe wasn’t sure about “doing art” with your kids, what would you most want to know? These are the answers I received:

Husband: I don’t know. What do you want to know about [his industry]??

9yo: Give them things to do—art activities.

12yo: Make sure they know it’s easy.

5yo: Tell them what Art is.

I’m not touching “what Art is” with a ten-foot pole, I’ll tell you that much! (But the 5yo definitely thinks big and all-encompassing.) I like my oldest’s response. Inspiring confidence is definitely a goal of mine.

With all this writing ahead of me, I am keenly missing my running time. I didn’t necessarily compose writing while I was running—letting my mind wander in that way resulted in slower running, I noticed—but focusing my mind on breathing and pacing left it open to work on ideas without me beaming a spotlight on the process. Running is active mindfulness for me, clearing the brain. Oh, how I miss it. I get out for one-mile walks when I can, but that’s only 15 minutes and doesn’t have quite the same mind-clearing effect. I have another follow-up with the orthopedist next week and I’m hoping he says I can at least head back to the track (a soft, level surface) for short runs.

Sewing projects in progress.

Sewing projects in progress.

So how did I spend my weekend? Was I working on those deadlines? Um, not so much. I spent it at karate with the kids. Taking my daughter shopping to spend a gift card. She loved the mama-daughter shopping time (the boys went to get haircuts with dad), and I love that she loved it, even though department store shopping isn’t my thing. Doing the weekly grocery shopping, which, until spring arrives, now includes flowers as a line item. Sewing some pouches, none of which are complete yet. Planning another linocut. Spinning the wheels in my head a bit. How about you?

Lily sketch.

Lily sketch.