Category Archives: collage

Art Quiltlet: 34/52

hand stitched collage art quiltlet at amyhoodarts.com

This has been an interesting week. My two older kids began school (the youngest starts next week). I have three kids at three schools on three different schedules, and two of them need transportation. My oldest began high school at a magnet STEM program, so he needs to be driven to the bus stop, and I’ve been getting up at 5:30 every morning to make sure he’s up. (High school. When I began blogging, at a long-gone blog, he was four.) Sunday night I messed up my sewing machine, which was well overdue for a cleaning anyway, so I was without that all week. I also had an allergic reaction to a new detergent we tried, specifically for sweaty workout clothes, and my skin has been flaring and miserable since Sunday. I fell down the stairs very early one morning. Getting up at 5:30 stinks.

So, anyway, without a sewing machine, I completely hand-stitched this week’s quiltlet. It includes flannel (which I sometimes use as the middle of the sandwich, instead of batting), gelatin-printed cotton, organza, tulle, and plastic netting from a clementine box. I stitched the layers together with the blue embroidery thread stitches, leaving some of the flannel exposed. When I cropped, I stitched the crop line with regular thread, then finished the edges with blanket stitch. This took me all week, in fits and starts, which is actually the kind of time I had. My youngest and I were doing things together while her brothers were in school, and that wake-up schedule has me pretty tired anyway. I need to get used to it.

Next week we add the final moving part into this logistical challenge of getting the kids where they need to be, and on time, every day. Hopefully it doesn’t all fall apart.

Art Quiltlet: 33/52

Leaf art quiltlet at amyhoodarts.com

Earlier in the week I saw this photograph come across my Instagram feed, and I liked it quite a bit. It stuck in my head, and definitely inspired last week’s quiltlet (completed on Saturday, just posted late). This quiltlet uses several techniques, and I like that I’m getting more comfortable mixing different methods. It’s also great to have expanded my technique toolbox, so to speak, so I have more options and a better likelihood of portraying something the way I see it in my head.

The top of this piece is composed of three layers. I wanted a lighter value green than any I had in stash, so I took a white piece of fabric and used Neocolor II watersoluble pastels on it, then sprayed with water and brushed to blend. The green is the middle layer, with the coral on the bottom and the purple on top. I stitched the leaf and then ripped away the fabric around it using the stitch and slash method, except I used scissors in places for a cleaner edge and I trimmed the green close on the outside edge rather than letting it show. Then I printed the coral with stripes of darker pink paint. After making a quilt sandwich, I free-motion stitched around them, cropped, and zigzagged the edges.

Leaf art quiltlet, detail, at amyhoodarts.com

Leaf art quiltlet, detail

This came out about how I’d hoped, and was a fun bit of play on a Saturday afternoon. I need to bring my sewing machine in for service on Monday–I have thread tangled around the tension discs and it’s not something I can remedy at home (it’s overdue for a cleaning anyway). Depending on how long they keep it, I may be doing this week’s quiltlet entirely by hand. I could borrow my daughter’s Hello Kitty machine–but there is something appealing about adding another layer of challenge.

Art Quiltlet: 25/52

Home? art quiltlet at amyhoodarts.com

This week marks one year in Annapolis for us. But a big part of my heart is missing New England and in particular, my little patch of backyard nature and the proximity to the ocean. I have neither here. I knew I would miss it a lot but I think I still managed to underestimate how much. This week’s quiltlet incorporates paper maps and reflects my homesickness. This time of year the whip-poor-will in our backyard would be calling out every night at 9pm; barred owls would be having midnight conferences; the towhee’s song would light up my days, and the veery’s warbling downhill melody would signal dusk. Wood thrushes and warblers, salamanders and snakes, peepers at the pond. Favorite beaches only minutes away, with salt ponds full of fish, crabs, and jellies; days spent playing in saltwater and mud. I am sad. I miss it all.

I don’t hate it here, but I don’t love it either. It just is. There are certainly more opportunities here than in Rhode Island, for all of us. There were things we had to adjust to, things that needed to be changed (my daughter’s school, for one), definitely things that give me pause, but also things to be grateful for, like neighbors who can watch children in a pinch, and whom I can help as well.  When people ask if I like it here, I simply say, Some things are better, some are worse, and some things are just plain perplexing, and I’m sure that’s true of everywhere.

Art Quiltlets: 18 + 19/52

Again with the double post! I’m making weekly, just didn’t get a chance to post last week. I was busy working on a larger piece, which is actually where last week’s quiltlet came from. At the end of the week I looked at all the scraps on my work table, pulled some out, and collaged an art quiltlet.

Scraps art quiltlet at amyhoodarts.com

That white fabric with black printing wasn’t even used in the larger piece, in the end, but it found its way here. This was pure play, and it’s fun how many of the same elements turned into something so different than the piece from which they originated.

This week, I carved a stamp inspired by a book I found on the library shelf while browsing, Art Deco Textiles. Then I used it to make this little quiltlet.

Lepidoptera art quiltlet at amyhoodarts.com

The quiltlet itself is very simple. I’ve been in a frenzy of creating/sewing the past several weeks and I think I needed a little simple. But I like its quietness. Also, I really like carving stamps and I’m getting lots of inspiration from that book.

And now I am caught up on posting the quiltlets! I can’t believe we’re almost to week 20 of 2016.

Art Quiltlet: 9/52

selvedge quiltlet at amyhoodarts.com

This week’s quiltlet was created with a pile of trimmed selvedge edges from a recent project, which I haven’t shared here yet (but will soon). It occurred to me that this is a nice way to remember projects that get sent away, as this one will be. Of course, I have scraps of the fabric I used, too, but I like these overlapped and sewn down here as well.

I also like the back. I think I’ll be doing more white stitching on white fabric.

selvedge quiltlet, back, at amyhoodarts.com

Short post! Simple quiltlet.

Art Quiltlet: 8/52

Circles art quiltlet at amyhoodarts.com

I’m calling this “Circles” but I feel I could have called it Kitchen Sink, because I threw a lot in there. I started by printing some white dish cloth fabric with bubble wrap painted with black and red acrylic paint. Then I cut circles out of some plaid-ish Japanese cotton.

Circles art quiltlet in progress at amyhoodarts.com

I sandwiched my quilt layers before stitching on the circles, then changed to white thread for some free motion quilting practice. It’s kind of a meandering trail because I kept losing track of myself a bit, but the stitching is even, so I’m calling that a win. Then I sewed on some plastic netting, I believe from a box of clementines, that had been used for printing at some point and had mostly black paint on it. So some printing, applique, free motion stitching, and collage. It was fun to make. I’ve only made eight of these so far, but I seem to be moving back and forth between more planned ideas and just plain playing around. That’s a good mix for a creativity practice.

Short post today because I’m off to teach the first meeting of an after-school art enrichment class at my daughter’s elementary school. After getting dinner prep out of the way first thing this morning, I spent the rest of the day playing with my sewing machine and painting another sample for class, and soon I get to make art with some kids. Can’t complain–Thursday is pretty good.

Art Quiltlet: 6/52

Art Quiltlet, amyhoodarts.com

This week’s, called “There Are Layers,” is inspired by Valentine’s Day. All those perfect hearts, right? Don’t know about you, but mine is 42 years old and a bit battered and bruised, with tender bits protected by harder bits. This heart has four layers, sewn onto a scrap of denim. The bottom layer is a typical sweet Valentine’s fabric with hearts. The next one up is muslin with black acrylic paint sponged onto it. That one has a tear in it so the word “love” could show through. On top of that is some red netting from an onion bag, and finally some white tulle. I’ve been meaning to get some paint and non-fabric into these quiltlets so this is a start. Plus, you know, fun.

I kept the same bobbin in when I switched from red thread to black–here’s a picture of the back, because I think that peek behind the scenes is interesting.

art quiltlet, back, amyhoodarts.com

This one, you’d really need to hold in your hands to see the details, I think. I’m sort of surprised this is only the sixth one. January and February really do last forever, don’t they? Each week I wonder if I’ll have a hard time coming up with an idea but forcing your brain to be creative really does make it think more creatively. Love how that works. (Probably I’ve just cursed myself to have no ideas next week. We’ll see.)

Postcard Idea: Color Collage

color theme postcards copy

This week, in support of the Summer Mail Art Swap, we’re sharing the simple idea of making a color collage postcard. The first thing to do is choose a couple of main colors to focus on and gather materials. We have a cigar box of small paper scraps and an expanding file folder of larger scraps and collage papers that are more or less sorted by color. That makes gathering colored papers easier.

I chose red and yellow, so I looked through our papers and chose some I liked. I used a 4×6″ piece of prepared cereal box as my substrate.

Go ahead and gather more paper than you'll need. It's good to have choices as you work.

Go ahead and gather more paper than you’ll need. It’s good to have choices as you work.

My son chose orange and green, and my daughter chose blue and pink. Each selected the papers they wanted to use and arranged them–without gluing–onto their postcard until they were happy. I glued some things down while still arranging. Work in whatever way suits you. We glued our pieces down using gel medium and an old paintbrush. I brushed a final coat of gel medium over all my pieces to seal them down. Make sure all the edges are secure so nothing gets caught in the mail sorting machinery.

color theme postcards

My daughter’s blue and pink postcard is on the top left, my yellow and red one is on the top right, and my son’s green and orange one is on the bottom. This is also a fun way to experiment with different and perhaps unusual color combinations.

There’s still plenty of time to join in with the mail art swap. All the details are here.

Other posts in this series:
Postcard Substrates: What to Use
Postcard Idea: Found Poetry
Postcard Q + A

Postcard Substrates–What to Use?

As part of the Summer Mail Art Swap, I’ll be posting ideas, links, and tutorials, hopefully every Monday. This week, let’s talk about the postcard substrate–in other words, what you’ll be creating your original postcard art on.

possible postcard substrates at amyhoodarts.com

You can buy blank postcards, of course, such as the watercolor postcards pictured above, but you don’t have to. This is just a pad of 4″x6″ sheets of watercolor paper. It’s far cheaper to cut watercolor paper down to size yourself.

The yellow pad is Bristol board. I’ll admit, this is one of my favorite surfaces for collage and postcards. It cost about $6 for 20 sheets, each of which can produce 4 postcards. (It was $10, but I had a 40% off coupon at my local art store.)

However, you don’t need to buy a thing. Save your cardboard boxes from the recycling bin–they make great surfaces for postcards! The blank inside is perfect for writing on. You can paint or collage right onto the side with the image, or you can cover it with gesso first to start with a blank white surface. If you want to do that, here’s how.

First, I cut off the side, top, and bottom flaps so I have two even rectangles. Then I lightly sanded it with fine sandpaper. This roughs up the surface so the gesso goes on better.

prepping a cereal box for gesso at amyhoodarts.com

Then apply a layer of gesso, which you can find in art stores or big-box craft stores in the art supply aisle. I’m not using a fancy brush; I got this one at the hardware store for probably a dollar.

painting gesso on cereal box at amyhoodarts.com

Once it was dry, I decided I wanted a second coat, so I lightly sanded again and painted on another coat of gesso. All done–ready to be worked on!

gessoed cereal box at amyhoodarts.com

You can cut them to size first and work on them small, or collage and paint first and then cut them down, as I demonstrate here.

Karen has a helpful post with 10 “cheap or free” items you can use for postcard substrates, too.

Art Together Issue Four: Mixed Media

Art Together Issue Four at amyhoodarts.comA week later than planned but worth the wait, I hope: Art Together Summer 2014: Mixed Media is out in the world today. This is Issue Four, which means a year ago, I was just fleshing out my idea for this zine. Now my green Moleskine that I use as my external brain for this project is full of notes, to-do lists, and brainstorming, and four whole issues exist in reality.

My goal all along has been to provide encouragement and inspire confidence, to demystify art supplies, terms, and techniques, so adults can feel comfortable playing and exploring right alongside kids. Art-making is so much fun and I’ve discovered how vital it is to my sense of well-being. It’s not fair to leave it all to the kids; we adults need it too. And exploring together has been so wonderful for us.

This issue’s focus, Mixed Media/Collage, so easily lends itself to play. Mixed media really is as simple as using more than one artistic medium, in other words, combining art materials. In this issue we learn about the artist Joseph Cornell and create our own assemblage boxes. We play with found paper, collage, photographs, and whatever art materials we choose to combine. We make our own collage book and learn about different types of glue. And we interview Karen Isaacson, the organizational mastermind behind Mail Me Some Art.

We have some fun things coming up, too–some give-aways, an excerpt from Karen’s interview to share, and, inspired by her swaps of mail art, my kids and I will be organizing a mail art swap for kids. That’ll be open to anyone who’s interested, of course, whether or not you purchase Art Together. Check for details before the end of June (hopefully as soon as next week). Here’s to a fun summer of art-making!

All the details on Issue Four, including how to purchase, can be found right here. (Psst: Use code ARTPLAY for 20% off through July 31.)