Category Archives: announcements

Image + Imagination: Anne Arundel County Juried Exhibition

This exhibit is opening tonight, and I’m really excited and pleased to be represented. I have a textile piece, “Fractured,” included, and I want to tell you a little bit about it.

"Fractured" textile art at amyhoodarts.com

Creating has been up and down this year. It took me a bit to get back into the studio after moving and the Inauguration, and when I did, I began by sewing my feelings. Sew, slash, sew, slash, trying to get the inside out. This piece was the result, and what I intended. Something shattered, something broken, something fractured, but still in one piece. I almost didn’t submit this one. I first thought, It’s just piecing. Will that be taken seriously as “art” for a juried exhibition? I looked at it again and felt that if it were paint, ie, a more “traditional” fine art medium, I wouldn’t even be thinking twice, so I submitted it. I am extremely pleased that this textile piece is included in this exhibit, and I’m looking forward to seeing all the artwork. The Mitchell Gallery has been giving peeks on its Instagram feed and it all looks wonderful.

Announcements!

baby house finches at amyhoodarts.com

A nest chock FULL of baby house finches

A rather housekeeping-ish post ahead, so I thought it best to start with a photo of the baby house finches nesting on our front door. We expect they’ll have to fledge any minute now because how on earth are those five birds squeezing themselves into that nest? They might just fledge when they start falling out, I don’t know. Aren’t they gorgeous? Little dinosaurs with beautiful wing feathers. My door, on the other hand, is a sight. Much poop. We’ll deal with it.

So, news! I’ve revived my dormant email list for news and added inspirations. Sign up is on the right. But let me share a few things here as well….

In March I sold some items to benefit the Southern Poverty Law Center. This month I’m selling zip pouches made of upcycled woven plastic birdseed bags. The images on them are fantastic! The full purchase price, minus listing fees, will be donated to the National Park Foundation. I think these pouches would be great for summer explores. Making things to sell in order to donate is one of the ways I’m dealing with my anxiety over every new announcement. It’s a little bit of, Here’s something I can do. It’s not the only thing I’m trying to do, but it’s part.

If you’re local to Annapolis, MD, or planning to visit the area, I have work in two upcoming shows downtown and zip pouches in two local stores. Maryland Federation of Art’s Spring Member Show runs from May 4 to May 26 at the Circle Gallery in Annapolis, and Image and Imagination: Anne Arundel County Juried Exhibition 2017 is at Mitchell Gallery from May 23 to June 11.

I still have pencil pockets at Art Things in Annapolis, and The Twisted Bead in Edgewater just began carrying my zip pockets in multiple sizes.

I’m getting more confident in what I make and do, and in talking about it. I still struggle (always will, I think) in getting down to it sometimes. So much else competes for my time, and when I get out of the habit of just going in and working, it’s harder to get started. I mean, this is obvious for anything, it’s just that a habit can so easily be knocked out of whack (sick kids, extra things in the schedule, whatever) and not so easily established again. So it’s a constant effort. There is always more going on in my head than is actually productively happening. And I still feel like I’m at three-quarter speed. Better than just after the inauguration, but not fully functioning. (Still struggling with reading books and inertia in general and with sleep, always.) Anyway, some random thoughts at the end of this post on creative effort, I guess. Oh, and it turns out submitting to shows can actually result in being in shows but never submitting guarantees not being in any. Hmm.

Art Quiltlet: 50/52

House art quiltlet, amyhoodarts.com

We bought a house! It has a front porch AND a deck. It’s surrounded by trees, but part of a neighborhood. It feels remote (woods! no streetlights! nature!) but it’s only 15 minutes from downtown. It’s the nicest house by far that I’ll have ever lived in–the kids will each have their own rooms, plus we can have a guest room, plus a room for my art-making. The windows are big and let in lots of natural light. It’s airy and welcoming for entertaining. I can’t wait to move in.

Originally we were going to wait until spring to look for a house, but a few months ago, when the toilet backed up into the tub (that’s as gross as you think it is) and the landlord told us he felt it was our fault for “misuse of the tub,” that was the last straw for living here. Bad enough all the plumbing issues we’ve had, among other issues, in this house that had never been rented before and really wasn’t up to handling five people, but to then have the owner decide it must be us, rather than the old, weary plumbing–it was insulting. We started looking the next day. We put an offer in on this house the day before the election. It’s been hard to be excited about it as we moved through negotiations, inspections, and all the rest, what with the general state of the world. But we still need to have a place to live, and renting here is no longer workable. Yes, for a while, it was nice knowing if something went wrong, it wasn’t our financial responsibility. But the lack of control is just too hard. I will just say, this is not how we maintain a house we own, but we don’t own this one. I will miss our next door neighbors, and I’ll miss running over the Naval Academy Bridge, but I will not miss this old dusty leaky cricket-infested house AT ALL.

And every time we buy a house I feel fortunate. We began saving for a down payment the year we got married, 1999. At the time I was babysitting a coworker’s children once a week; her husband was a financial planner. I don’t think I knew of anyone who used a financial planner, and maybe didn’t even know it was a thing until I met them, and without a doubt we wouldn’t have even thought to seek one out. But there he was, and he helped us grow the money we saved faster than we expected, so we were able to buy a house before prices really exploded. When we sold that first house, we had made quite a bit, and we have put that money right back into subsequent houses ever since. We were disciplined, yes, and we hit the timing very well, but we were also connected to someone who could help us make the most of both, and that’s privilege. I recently saw an article that Millennials who own houses do so because their parents either helped them with a down payment, or with college costs, or both. We’re older than that generation, and our college cost less (and one of us had help), but we still benefited from who we know. It really does take luck on top of discipline and work.

That’s my housing story. And since this is quiltlet number 50, here’s another grouping of ten.

art quiltlets 41-50 at amyhoodarts.com

Not all my quiltlets are textile diary entries, but many fall under that category, and without looking back I’d guess this grouping of ten has more of those than most. It’s been a difficult year. I feel a bit conflicted, ending the year on a high personal note (yay! a house!) while also feeling despair and fear over the state of the country and the world. It’s been hard to feel positive over anything. Two more weeks, and quiltlets, to go in 2016.

Introducing Gallery

I’ve added a Gallery tab up top there, which takes you to photos of finished work, all of which are available (unless it says otherwise). Here’s the latest addition

"Squid," 8"x8" plus hanging loops. Neocolor and hand-dyed cottons, machine and hand stitching.

“Squid,” 8″x8″ plus hanging loops. Neocolor and hand-dyed cottons, machine and hand stitching.

I had the urge to stitch a squid–things like that happen–so I did. This is a layered reverse appliqué (stitch & slash style, except I used scissors), with the blue layer free-motioned stitched first. The blue is created with Neocolor water-soluble pastels, and the red and purple are hand-dyed. The squid’s patterning is also free-motion stitching, with hand stitching to create the eye.

I’ll continue to add pieces to the Gallery page as I finish them.

amyhoodarts at HERE. a pop up shop

HERE square

I’m back to selling, finally! I’ll have zip pouches and stamped notebooks at HERE’s next pop-up shop. I first learned about this shop in the fall, and I visited a few of the pop-ups before submitting, both to get a feel for what they carry and to see whether they already had items similar to mine. Their shops always have a really great vibe, with a great mix of items that are predominantly made by local artists. It’s a comfortable place to be, full of pretty things. I’m happy to be included this time around and excited to be stepping more into the great, vibrant creative community here in Annapolis, even ever so cautiously. I spent last week stamping, embroidering, sewing, and tagging in preparation. After the pop-up is complete, I will (finally!) open my Etsy shop again, after having it closed since before we moved. Ahem. It’s taken me a bit to get my feet under me, I think!

If you’re local, I hope to see you there! And if you’re not, Amy & El (the owners/founders) post pictures of their artists’ lovely creations on Facebook and Instagram and will sell online.

 

More Changes

lilies at amyhoodarts.com

These are growing in our yard, which is one way you know we don’t actually own the property. (I’m a terrible gardener!)

I’ve been quiet here. Turns out big changes can be a little overwhelming and make you want to sit on the deck reading more than anything else–in between realizing it’s pretty easy to get to Washington, DC; learning your way around without using GPS; and registering all your kids for school. Right, so that’s the first of the “more changes” referenced above. For the first time ever, all three of my kids will be starting out in school this year. For various reasons, we’ve decided it’s time to give that a try. If you know me at all, you know we are proceeding with research and support and, as always, the willingness to try something else if the first thing isn’t working. Also, if you know me at all, you know that I am not unaffected by this sort of change. It’s a big one.

cone flowers at amyhoodarts.com

Many of my neighbors have gorgeous flower gardens. I enjoy them very much.

The second change is that I’ve decided to stop producing new issues of Art Together at this time, although the six existing issues will still remain available for download. I don’t like to rule things out forever, so maybe I’ll pick it back up at some point in the future. But I doubt that, because it’s simply not financially sustainable. While I do enjoy researching it and putting it together, it’s a huge time commitment. I suspect I’m not all that great at marketing–but I have tried, without much success. This makes me sad for those who enjoy it so much, and have let me known, because I enjoy spreading my art-love in this way. I’m not sure what I’ll do, especially with all those school hours coming my way. I’m not deciding yet. The first half of this year was, in cumulative, quite stressful, even as I attended to self-care to keep that stress under control. So much unknowing for so long, along with huge changes, and adjusting to someplace new–I would like to just process for a bit. Sit on my deck and read. Go for runs in a new city. Share things that are interesting, when I get around to turning on the computer, but hopefully, too, become part of the community right here where I live. And just see what comes next.

Art Together Issue Six: Math + Art

{Click here to be taken directly to the sales page on Payhip. For UK/EU customers, VAT is added during the checkout process and isn’t reflected in the $4 USD price.}

I’ve been plugging along on the winter issue of Art Together and–thanks so much, polar vortex–even though it’s almost March, we’re still firmly in the midst of winter, so I don’t feel behind schedule at all even though I didn’t begin until I was sure I’d have a way to easily sell it no matter where you live (thanks so much, Payhip!). Introducing Issue Six: Math + Art:

Art Together Issue 6: Math + Art at amyhoodarts.com

From this issue’s Dear Reader:

Math and art are linked in so many ways. It’s not necessary to force a connection; it’s already there, and has been for centuries. This is a comforting idea for those of us who can feel intimidated or anxious by a wide-open, anything goes approach to art-making. I loved my photography classes (in the pre-digital days) precisely because of the mix of creativity and precision. Photography was part art, part science, and it provided a great balance for me. My photography notebook was, essentially, a lab notebook. What happens when you adjust the light? The ratio of chemicals? The exposure or development time? I enjoyed the experimentation and the structure. This mix satisfied both my creative and my logical sides. And while I have loosened up quite a bit over the years when it comes to art-making, I still am comforted by structure and limits at times.

I have a child who likes structure in his art-making as well, and this issue is created with kids and adults like him in mind. Here are some starting points, some guidelines, some ways in which the wonderful predictability of numbers and geometry and the science of how we see can be used to make art…

issue 6 collage copy

In this issue:

Dear Reader
Artist Spotlight: Bridget Riley
Featured Material: Colored Pencils by guest contributor Mo Awkati
Activity: Op Art—Weaving
Activity: Op Art—Distorted Shapes
Perspective
Activity: Drawing a Box in Perspective
The Fibonacci Sequence
Activity: Using Fibonacci Numbers
Activity: Mandalas
Resources
Try This: Op Art Backgrounds + Shapes

The 35-page PDF download is available for purchase through Payhip here for $4 USD. For UK/EU customers, VAT is added during the checkout process. Currently all issues of Art Together are listed for $4 USD; you can find them all right here.

Thanks for your continued support, emails, and comments when it comes to this little project of mine. I love seeing and hearing about what you and your kids are exploring and discovering together.

Strawberry DNA + Cheese

Two separate activities, of course. Homeschooling goes on, amidst everything else, and I’d like to report on what N is doing more frequently but, well, many things have fallen off the list here, replaced with super fun activities like cleaning and clearing all the things. It’s more of a priority to do the activities than blog about them, obviously. But I wanted to share some things from this week and lo! I have managed to.

Firstly, he is working through his chosen science curriculum, REAL Science Odyssey Level 2. It’s a challenge–this is definitely not just a review of things he already knows. Depending on the material, I have us cover a chapter in two weeks instead of one, so we’re just now starting Chapter 7, which introduces DNA. In one of my decluttering sweeps I found instructions for extracting DNA from strawberries, which we picked up years ago at an open house event at URI’s Graduate School of Oceanography. You can find lots of instructions online for this if you search. I like URI’s handout because the measurements are scientific and precise–in milliliters and grams–and it explains the why behind each step. The only thing I had to go out and buy was pineapple juice.

N is proudly displaying the test tube containing our results.

DNA extracted from strawberries at amyhoodarts.com

The DNA is that cloudy stuff right at the spot where the clear liquid (cold rubbing alcohol) and the pink liquid (strawberry mixture) meet. Here’s a close-up.

DNA extracted from strawberries at amyhoodarts.com

How cool is that?? So cool. Then we fished it out with a toothpick and looked at it under the microscope. You can’t see the double helix, of course, but it’s still so cool.

Earlier this week, he made cheese. Just about a year ago, he made his first couple of batches, and then…lost interest. He asked to do it again recently, and chose a dessert ricotta. The recipe called for citric acid powder, which we finally tracked down at the local Ace Hardware after striking out in all grocery stores we tried. The cheese was fantastic.

homemade dessert ricotta at amyhoodarts.com

We realized we needed something to eat it with, so we made cake. The next day I made ricotta cookies. We still have about half a pound of ricotta left, so I think I’ll make more ricotta cookies. This is a yummy project.

And one final thing related to homeschooling…the latest issue of Home/School/Life Magazine is out; my column is full of tips to make visiting an art museum with young kids fun for everybody. You can subscribe or buy a single issue of the magazine here, or try to win a copy at Mud Puddles to Meteors.

Introducing Art Together Issue Five: Shape + Space

Art Together Issue Five: Shape + Space at amyhoodarts.com

Wow! I am really happy to have this finished! I love researching and creating these magazines (or I wouldn’t do it), and of course I like sitting down and making art with my kids. But I’ve felt so harried with getting our house in shape that finishing this issue was hanging over my head–I wanted it done and out in the world, not reproaching me, not quite complete, from my computer. Here it is. I hope you find it worth the wait.

All the information, and how to purchase, can be found on the Art Together Issue Five: Shape + Space page. You can use the code SHAPE20 for 20% off any Art Together purchase, and speaking of codes, MOVINGSALE is good for 20% off in my Etsy shop until we move. (I’m aiming for less to pack!)

I plan to get back to posting here more regularly. I’m not done with decluttering and such, but I am done with having no balance whatsoever. At some point, all the listing prep will be complete, but I need to not be a frazzled shred by then.