Category Archives: announcements

And More Transitions

I’m still getting used to the new schedule. Between drop-off and pick-up, N and I are busy all day with his work, and then the next shift begins, with after-school activities and dinner. (Sometimes the former conflicts with preparing the latter.) I haven’t yet identified where I could squeeze in some pockets of time for me in this schedule, so I’m tired, but I know from experience it will shake out eventually.

Meanwhile, I can finally share (because it’s now definite) that we’ll be relocating from Rhode Island to the DC area, Maryland side, once we sell our house. So somehow, we need to deal with everything that’s cluttered up since we moved into this house almost 11 years ago and get it ready to go on the market. My husband and I both grew up here so this is a big change–but a very exciting one. I’ll miss this:

transitions 2-beach

Morning coffee at the salt pond behind the barrier beach–one of our favorite places, just 15 minutes from home.

But I won’t miss this:

Sometimes the snow builds up, and sometimes we get almost 2 feet all at once.

Sometimes the snow builds up storm by storm, and sometimes we get almost 2 feet all at once.

We’ve told the kids, and we’re helping them process the news and soliciting their ideas on what sort of house and community we’d like to live in. As the decision-making process was going on, my one request was that we remain together as a family. I didn’t want to end up in a situation where my husband was already in Maryland at his new position while the kids and I were up here, trying to sell the house so we could join him. We have a generous amount of time to relocate, but still, we need to get the house in order and start the process. So this space may be a bit quiet as I try to spend the pockets of time I do carve out to clean and declutter.

Postcards!

Two nights ago I sorted out all the kid postcards I’ve received. Here’s a badly lit photo of my living room floor (the cat, of course, had to plop himself in the middle of the action).

sorting postcards at amyhoodarts.com

A total of 98 postcards were made by 21 children from Connecticut, Missouri, Rhode Island, Indiana, Washington state, Virginia, California, and New York. They used collage, markers, stickers, watercolors, stamps, pastels, acrylics, and more. They were creative, they wrote notes to the recipients, they made me smile over and over. Eight adults also made postcards, which I loved to see.

postcards by kids at amyhoodarts.com

Some of the postcards made by children for the summer mail art swap.

The first batch is getting mailed today. I’m sending them out in groups, in hopes of drawing out the fun of getting mail on the other end. Much better to get your postcards spread out a little instead of all on one day, yes? I didn’t place a limit on how many postcards any one person could send in, but if a child made roughly 6 or more, he or she will most likely get more than one from the same person in return. (It’s math, folks. Had to be done.) But hopefully nobody minds, as all the postcards are fun and fabulous.

postcards by kids at amyhoodarts.com

More fabulous postcards.

Big thanks to all the families who made postcards and bundled them up with stamps and labels and got them in the mail to me, trusting a perfect stranger to sort these works of art and send them on their way. Does it sound too sappy to say that every envelope I received added happiness to my day?

Watercolor Sketches + Shop Update

The final two watercolor sketches from last week. I only missed one day, Thursday, so I ended up with six total for the week.

watercolor sketch at amyhoodarts.com

watercolor sketch at amyhoodarts.com

I thought it would be fun to show the process, so I took photos along the way while making the strawberry sketch. I did this one Saturday evening, so the lighting isn’t the best. Before I share all those photos, though, I wanted to let you know that hand-stamped blank cards and lino prints and watercolors are now available in the shop. It took a bit of self-talk (and some encouraging talk by other people) to list the prints and watercolors. It feels different from the other products. They serve no purpose other than to hang on the wall; it’s a public declaration of my belief that my artwork is worthy of offering for sale. That’s not easy to do. (Which I only share because I think it’s better for all of us creative types if we admit when we feel a bit wobbly. Everybody does, you know.)

On to the strawberries.

still life set up at amyhoodarts.com

The still life set up.

initial pencil sketch at amyhoodarts.com

Initial pencil sketch.

traced over with ink at amyhoodarts.com

Traced over with ink (copic multiliner).

first wash of watercolor at amyhoodarts.com

First wash of watercolor.

more color added at amyhoodarts.com

More color added.

almost done at amyhoodarts.com

Almost done.

 

just needs to dry at amyhoodarts.com

Just needs to dry.

It takes a while to complete one because of the waiting time in between layers of color. If you add wet watercolors next to (or on top of) wet watercolor, it’ll bleed together. Sometimes that’s exactly what you want. Other times, it’s not, so it needs to dry first. You can see I have the paper taped down to a board (it’s a clipboard). I leave it that way until it dries. It helps keep it from curling too much.

In some ways this makes it a perfect type of painting for me to do. I’m always getting interrupted anyway. However, I’ve also gotten very good at telling the interrupter that I’m drawing/painting and I’ll get to them in a few minutes. All of my kids are old enough for me to be able to do this, generally. And they all respect the process, for the most part.

Shop Update (Part 1)

Another quick announcement post to let you know I’ve completed part one of the week’s planned shop update, listing all the pockets I’ve sewn recently. So currently in stock are some sweet whimsical flowers…

(They’re also available in blues and purples.)

…chickens are back…

…and there are several nautical themed pouches, inspired by my Rhode Island summers.

I’ve also added some large pockets, and I’m well stocked on pencil pouches in time for (I can barely even type this, sorry, I know it’s July) back-to-school shopping.

Part 2 of the update will happen within a few days–I have some hand-printed cards and notebooks to add. But I promise the next post will be about what I’m making and doing, not about what I’m selling. (I’m uncomfortable with the salesperson’s hat on, can you tell??)

Art Together Samples Available

art together color logo_cropped

Just a quick post to say I’ve added some samples from previous issues of Art Together, available as PDF downloads. They’re all listed on the main Art Together page as well as in the individual pages’ contents listings. If you’ve been wondering what the zine has to offer in terms of tone, content, and information, hopefully this will help! And as always, email me at amyhood at amyhoodarts dot com with any questions.

The available PDFs are:

The Color Wheel from Issue One: Color
Drawing With Tape from Issue Two: Line
Artist Spotlight: Hokusai from Issue Three: Printmaking
Scratch Foam Prints from Issue Three: Printmaking

Postcard Q + A

{Claudine is giving away a copy of Art Together: Issue Four–you have one more day to enter!}

In support of The Summer Mail Art Swap, this week I’m answering some questions I’ve heard. Let’s go!

Is my two-year-old too young to participate?

Nope! Everybody’s art is welcome.

My 5yo daughter wanted to photograph this letter before sending it to her penpal.

My 5yo daughter wanted to photograph this letter before sending it to her penpal.

Suppose my child doesn’t want to mail his or her artwork away?

We deal with this as well. My daughter is very comfortable with giving away her drawings and creations, but my boys, not so much. Sometimes we’ve made one to keep and one to send. We’ve taken pictures before sending letters or artwork along. You could make color photocopies or scan in original artwork. But ultimately, some kids just aren’t ready or willing to give away something they created, and I’ve never insisted.

How will I know you received our postcards?

I’ll send you an email when I receive your envelope. If you mailed them out but haven’t heard from me by July 31, let me know they’re on their way. I’ll wait.

Isn’t it risky to just put the postcards in the mail without an envelope?

It can be. It depends upon what medium is used. Acrylics won’t bleed once they’re dry. Watercolors and water-based printmaking ink will. I usually just drop them in the mail and cross my fingers, figuring that the postal service tries not to let the mail get wet, and if it did, being in an envelope probably wouldn’t save a water-based art piece from running. But there are some things you can do.

First, make sure any glued-down pieces are thoroughly glued down, so no loose edges catch on anything and tear. You can seal the entire postcard with gel medium to help with loose bits and to protect it a bit. One participant wrote in to say they sealed their watercolor postcards with clear packing tape and their pastel postcards by brushing on a layer of lightly watered down school glue. These are great ideas using items you probably already have in the house.

Any other questions? Leave a comment! And there’s still plenty of time to participate. All the details are right here. Also check out Postcard Substrates: What to Use and Postcard Idea: Found Poetry.

Summer Mail Art Swap For Kids (And Their Adults!)

Summer Mail Art Swap at amyhoodarts.comMy kids and I thought it would be a lot of fun to host a handmade postcard swap for kids and families. They’ve seen me participate in some and get some really neat artwork back in the mail, and they’d like to do it, too. So we’d like to invite you to join in the Summer Mail Art Swap For Kids (And Their Adults).

The details are simple. Make some handmade postcards. I’ll post ideas, links, and tutorials over the next several weeks. Mail me your postcards (details below) by July 31, and we’ll sort them and send them out to someone else. Look for your one-of-a-kind artwork to arrive in the mail in August.

Why are we having them all mailed to us first? To avoid disappointment, mainly. It’s bad enough participating in a swap and getting nothing in return as an adult; it’s really, really disappointing for kids. I’m borrowing heavily from fabulous interviewee Karen’s instructions for her swaps (with her permission), with one added step. I don’t want my physical house address up on my blog in this post, so if you plan to participate, email me at amyhood at amyhoodarts dot com with the subject line “Summer postcard swap” and I’ll send you another copy of the details below, along with my mailing address.

I’m not posting a theme for this—go ahead and make any sort of postcard you want. Keep in mind it won’t be mailed to its final recipient in an envelope, though, because it’s a postcard (postcard dimensions are included in the details below). You could….paint, draw, collage, write a poem or a story or a cartoon, use a photograph, stitch, anything at all that you can think of, as long as it can be mailed. Like I said, we’ll share ideas here, too. And THIS IS OPEN TO ADULTS TOO. Because we make art together, you see, and the kids don’t get to have all the fun. Wouldn’t it be great to sit down for a family postcard-making session? However, I do want kids to get kid postcards, and adults to get adult postcards, so check the details on how to mark them.

Questions? Let me know. And share this post! This is open to anyone who wants to participate—you don’t need to have purchased a zine or be a regular reader. The more the merrier. Let’s have a summer of postcard creation and sharing!

The detailed directions:

Each person who makes and sends a postcard will get one back, addressed to him or her individually. Submit as many postcards as you want per person, all in the same envelope to me (you will get back the same number you send). Make sure you insert waxed paper or parchment in between the cards so they don’t get stuck together in the envelope, though.

Write “Summer Postcard Swap” on the back of your card, and please add an A if the card is by an adult and a C if it’s by a child.

It’s a good idea to write your return address on the back of the postcard (in case of postal delivery problems). You may also want to include an (adult’s) email address or website so the recipient can thank you. If your family is sending multiple postcards, you may receive postcards from various families. You might make some new friends!

A note for your partner is a nice touch. But remember I need half the postcard for the address. I use washi tape to divide my postcard backs, but drawing a line works too. Anything to help remind yourself to leave that right half blank.

Write what you want on the left side. Leave the right side open.

Include a mailing label with your name and address for each card you create. I’ll attach them to the cards I mail back to you. Return address labels work for this too. Please include the proper postage for each postcard you send (see below for postal guidelines).

International swappers are welcome–the postage cost is $1.15 per card and you can send that to me via Paypal (amyhood at amyhoodarts dot com).

DO NOT attach the stamps to your postcards, because I might be sending it to someone overseas! Just slip them into the envelope.

Postage and Card Size

You are welcome to make any size postcard you want, but please pay attention to the following postal guidelines:

In order to use the postcard rate ($.34) your card cannot be bigger than 4.25 x 6 inches, and it must be thin and flexible.  A 4×6 card that is thick, lumpy, or doesn’t bend needs more postage.

If your card is a rectangle bigger than a postcard, but still flat and flexible, a regular “forever” ($.49 ) stamp is what you need.

To keep things simple, stick to a basic rectangle so you can use one of those two stamp options.

You can find all the postal specifications (and a handy postage calculator) here: http://postcalc.usps.gov/

Again, questions? Email me at amyhood at amyhoodarts.com.

Art Together Issue Four: Mixed Media

Art Together Issue Four at amyhoodarts.comA week later than planned but worth the wait, I hope: Art Together Summer 2014: Mixed Media is out in the world today. This is Issue Four, which means a year ago, I was just fleshing out my idea for this zine. Now my green Moleskine that I use as my external brain for this project is full of notes, to-do lists, and brainstorming, and four whole issues exist in reality.

My goal all along has been to provide encouragement and inspire confidence, to demystify art supplies, terms, and techniques, so adults can feel comfortable playing and exploring right alongside kids. Art-making is so much fun and I’ve discovered how vital it is to my sense of well-being. It’s not fair to leave it all to the kids; we adults need it too. And exploring together has been so wonderful for us.

This issue’s focus, Mixed Media/Collage, so easily lends itself to play. Mixed media really is as simple as using more than one artistic medium, in other words, combining art materials. In this issue we learn about the artist Joseph Cornell and create our own assemblage boxes. We play with found paper, collage, photographs, and whatever art materials we choose to combine. We make our own collage book and learn about different types of glue. And we interview Karen Isaacson, the organizational mastermind behind Mail Me Some Art.

We have some fun things coming up, too–some give-aways, an excerpt from Karen’s interview to share, and, inspired by her swaps of mail art, my kids and I will be organizing a mail art swap for kids. That’ll be open to anyone who’s interested, of course, whether or not you purchase Art Together. Check for details before the end of June (hopefully as soon as next week). Here’s to a fun summer of art-making!

All the details on Issue Four, including how to purchase, can be found right here. (Psst: Use code ARTPLAY for 20% off through July 31.)

An Announcement or Two

sketching irises at amyhoodarts.com

G and I drawing and painting irises in the yard this weekend.

This is the day I’d planned to have Issue Four of Art Together available, despite spending half of March sick with a bad cold and losing a week in April to the flu. But last week I became sick again, and it turned out to be strep, and that was the last straw. So I requested a week extension from myself, and Myself listened, weighed the facts, and granted it. Mainly it’s just the tech stuff left to do, which does, in fact, require me to be conscious. I had no idea strep was more than just a bad sore throat! I could barely keep my eyes open for a while there, but antibiotics are lovely when you truly need them, aren’t they? Like magic.

Speaking of Issue Four, which focuses on mixed media + collage, if you’re interested in a review copy and/or giveaway, drop me a line at amyhood at amyhoodarts dot com and we’ll discuss.

And finally, if you’re in southern Rhode Island this summer, you can now find my pockets and cards in Thrifty Sister in Peace Dale. This is a great consignment store that also carries work by local artists. (It also happens to be an excellent source of interesting found paper for mixed media and collage.)

Craft Fair Announcement + Some Making

For those of you who are local, I’ll have a table at The Compass School’s Eco-Fair. Relevant info is on this flyer.

The Compass School Eco Fair flyer at amyhoodarts.com

I’ll be selling zippered pockets, of course, along with stamped Moleskines, stamped/printed blank cards, and possibly some matted prints. I sewed quite a few pockets last month, so this past week I’ve been busy with other things.

bunting + stamped notebooks at amyhoodarts.com

Up top is a portion of a bunting I stamped and sewed. It has eight of those triangles altogether, each with a different summery stamp. This is ultimately for the slider in our dining room, which right now is decorated with felt spring flowers on a crocheted vine. I like to change it up seasonally, but last year those flowers stayed up all summer. But I’m also going to use this to decorate my table at the fair.

Below are some small stamped Moleskines. I carved the house stamp a while ago but I don’t think I ever shared it, so here’s a close-up.

hand-carved house stamp at amyhoodarts.com

Finally, I’ve been painting rocks. I thought it would be nice to have some low-priced items that might appeal to kids, since it’s a school fair. These aren’t quite done yet. They’ll all get a coat of gloss acrylic varnish.

painted rocks at amyhoodarts.com

I’m not quite sure what to charge for these. Materials cost next to nothing, but of course they do take time (and very, very tiny brushes). Any ideas?