Springing

It’s springing all over the place in this yard, and we love it. I can hear frogs at night. Frogs! From my own driveway. From my own bed. It’s lovely music. Last weekend my husband spotted a “very large bird” on a tree branch in the yard. It was a hawk, sitting very very still. We all passed around binoculars; my eldest got a good look at the tail so we could identify it as a Cooper’s Hawk. Then, the hawk dove down into the underbrush and hopped up on a log with a snake hanging from its beak, writhing. One less snake out there. (We love snakes, but we’re now living some place with poisonous ones, so I’ve had to impress upon my younger kids that not all snakes are your friend. It took showing them pictures of injuries caused by copperhead bites.)

And then there are the nests.

house finch nest at amyhoodarts.com

I discovered this one first. See it there, in the bottom of the wreath? This wreath came with the house, and I’d been planning on replacing it in spring. I guess I’ll wait a while. I wasn’t quite sure what bird built this nest; I’d only caught a glimpse of a streaky bird flying away. Then she laid an egg.

house finch nest with egg at amyhoodarts.com

She’s now laid four. They are the sweetest wee eggs, and bluish. Not many birds lay blue eggs, turn out, so a bit of Googling and it was easy to identify this as a house finch’s nest. Turns out, they often build nests in wreaths. I’d seen the male house finches at the feeder in the front of the house, too. Now we’re trying to avoid the porch so as not to disturb her.

Then, a few days later, my husband noticed this mess of a nest in the garage.

carolina wren nest at amyhoodarts.com

It’s built up high. I had to stand on a table and reach my phone up to get that view; you can’t see the eggs from below. You can’t see the mama when she’s there, either; this nest is like a cave, with a hole to get into it and a domed roof. This was easy to confirm as a Carolina Wren nest, especially as we had one trapped in the garage overnight one night. Luckily our garage has windows we can leave open, since it’s not really practical to leave the garage door open overnight (although obviously she was managing fine when we were closing it nightly, as she laid all those eggs before we discovered what she was up to).

We feel quite attached to our bird families and excited for eggs to hatch. The last time we tracked a nest we were in Rhode Island, and it was a phoebe nest that was parasitized by cowbird eggs; the cowbird chicks thrived but the phoebe chicks were smothered. It was kind of awful. Hopefully these nests fare better.

Next post will have artsy content. But bird nests! Needed to be shared.