Art Quiltlet: 13/52

Blues art quiltlet at amyhoodarts.com

We’re one-quarter of the way through 2016, and I know this because this is my thirteenth weekly quiltlet. I’ve been feeling poorly for a few days now (something flu-ish but we’re not saying flu) and I was a little concerned if I’d get one done by the end of the week, but I split this between two days (which was necessary anyway, as you’ll see). This is an exploration of an idea in a different way than last week’s. That was, How can I interpret this scene using cloth and thread? (A question with many solutions, by the way; my result is just one way to solve that problem.) This week was an exploration of, What will happen if….

I had an idea in my head of a patchwork of blues, so I rummaged around in my bag of clothes scraps for different shades of denim, then I began piecing them with wrong sides together, so the raw edges would show, because one of the wonderful things about denim is how it frays. Right away, you see, I broke one of my rules for this challenge, which is to start with a whole cloth top, not pieced. Tough. My challenge, and I can break the rules if I want to.

Once the strips were sewn together the obvious next step was to throw it in with a load of towels to encourage my cut ends to fray. That’s why this was a two-day process–I ran out of time to do laundry yesterday before leaving to do some art with a group of kids, and last night I was in bed at 7 pm with my flu-ish self.

Once it was out of the dryer this morning, I began adding some quilting lines. I don’t always show what a piece looks like before cropping, but when it makes a huge difference, it’s fun to see:

Blues quiltlet before cropping at amyhoodarts.com

Usually I draw the cropping line with pencil, but there was no way that was working here! Fat black Sharpie was definitely needed. I really enjoy the process of working on a piece and then leaving things out. I don’t do it all the time, but it’s a really fun design exercise. It’s like revising in writing–some work is going to get left on the cutting table. But without doing all the work, even the stitching that doesn’t even show up in the finished piece, the finished piece won’t exist. I needed it all so I could cut on the angle and get the final quiltlet.

I like the back of this one too.

Blues quiltlet, back, at amyhoodarts.com

Just some simple lines, repeated evenly. Nice and clean.