Schooling Update

9yo using Cuisenaire rods to help with Singapore Math.

Friday was conference day at my oldest child’s school, when we sit down together with his teacher to check in and set goals. The pre-conference paperwork asked us, as his parents, to list our goals for him for the upcoming year; we wrote that we wanted him to set his own goals, as our goal is for him to be a self-directed learner. Honestly, I can’t think of any other answer to that question. It seems absurd to state what I think my son’s goals for himself should be.

At the same time, it’s been about a month since we began our non-summer homeschooling schedule. While learning happens all year round, we do add in more required work in the fall. Because I have one child in school, it makes the most sense to stick to the same sort of schedule, although that has its frustrations–I don’t enjoy being beholden to an outwardly imposed schedule. However, it’s a good point at which to check in with how we’re doing.

I began using Singapore Math with my 9yo this year, and I’m happy to say it’s going well. He knows more than he thinks he does; the main thing is overcoming his own self-doubt. A year ago, he’d have fought me on using a workbook and textbook; this year, he sometimes complains and needs reminders to focus, but he gets the work done. I’ve noticed that he does best with word problems (even though he says he doesn’t like them). He also took really well to Life of Fred last year, which is story based. I noted this and pointed it out to him—he seems to comprehend the numbers better when they are presented in a verbal way.

Another great help for explaining some of the concepts are Cuisenaire rods. We’ve had these for quite a long time and they have been useful many, many times. Most recently, I used them to demonstrate the concept of borrowing in subtraction. He needed a visual in order to understand that I wasn’t telling him to get rid of any numbers; we were just regrouping. After seeing it with the rods, it clicked in about a minute. Now he understands what’s going on when he borrows to subtract, rather than just doing it because he’s been told to but without any comprehension.

My 4yo, of course, wanted her own math to do. She was making up her own rather baffling worksheets, so I picked up a workbook for her. She’s happy, and I get a little bit of time to teach the day’s concept to my 9yo without her chatting our ears off.

The other area that has me really excited is language arts. We’re transitioning into using Brave Writer; we read August’s book, The Lemonade War, in September, using the copywork assignments and discussing grammar and a bit about writing style. We haven’t begun October’s book yet because we moved right into the sequel, The Lemonade Crime. This is my main logistical problem with using Arrow; we read aloud as a regular part of our homeschool, and trying to make one chapter book stretch out all month is limiting; there are other books we want to read too. I haven’t quite figured out how to handle that. We’ve also done some free-writing exercises and list-making; gentle ways to get my 9yo writing more often.

But then! I saw the book Guy-Write on the library shelf and asked him if he’d like to read it. He said yes, read it in about a day, and then…began writing a book. Something in that book hit him just the right way, and his writing is alive and exciting. He reads each chapter to me when he’s done. He told me the spelling is all wrong, but I told him when he was done writing, we could type it into the computer and worry about the spelling then. He declared I could be his editor. I’m a bit dumbfounded; he has “hated” writing for a few years now. I am cautiously optimistic, hoping this new-found love of writing will stick around.

My daughter is also writing—asking how to spell words and either writing as we tell her the letters or copying the words she’s dictated to me from another piece of paper. She’s been reciting letters off of signs, asking me what they spell. Just recently she began doing that in reverse, saying words and trying to sound out the letters they contain. Her brain is working constantly, it seems, on the puzzle of reading. It’s really cool to watch.

One area I’m not totally up on is project time. I’ve failed thus far to carve out predictable blocks of time for project work. I keep waiting for our weeks to settle down into a routine, but I think our routine is that there isn’t one. As much as I try to contain the errands, things like doctor’s appointments go where they fit, and we seem to have lots of those. So I’ve begun just claiming the time where I see it. I need to do a better job of reminding the kids what they wanted to accomplish, though. So project time is still a work in progress this year.

Of course we’re continuing our studies of history and science, supported with library books and so on, but math and language arts have taken such a huge leap lately, so that’s where I chose to focus on this recap. It seems like overstating the obvious, but a huge advantage of homeschooling is the ability to work with my child right where he is, to take advantage of leaps of understanding, and to take the time to work on trouble areas…as well as having the time to be patient and wait for the progression of things without feeling pushed and rushed to meet an artificially imposed standard. I’m thankful we can do this right now.

9 thoughts on “Schooling Update

  1. leslie rhodes

    thanks for sharing your school year so far. it sounds like you are doing amazing. I have heard great things about brave writer and maybe in the future we will use it.

    1. amy Post author

      Sure! With some things we’re doing really well…but we did much better with projects last year, so I need to fix that!

  2. Kirsten

    Sounds great, Amy! You’re doing an amazing job. So interesting to read about it. I’m going to click on those links when I get a quiet moment… Thanks for sharing!

    1. amy Post author

      Thanks, Kirsten, but I didn’t mean for it to sound amazing! We’re just muddling along like everyone else, with highs and lows. ;)

  3. Dawn Suzette

    Thanks for this update Amy!
    It would seem that we have carved out A LOT of project time but need to spend more time on our “academic” lessons. The time devoted to them seems to get shorter and shorter as the week progresses. ;-)

    1. amy Post author

      Getting that balance is so hard! I’ve noticed I tend to want to get the “required” stuff done in the morning, when I have the most energy, but by the time we’re done with lunch, it’s hard to get into project time. Maybe I need to flip-flop at least a day…

  4. Jen

    Loved reading this! Felt like I was sitting in your living room. (Or mine!) So valuable to hear from others as we each navigate.

  5. donna lee

    I like hearing how the children are learning. I remember when each of my girls was in 4th grade. That’s the year they study NJ. I had to sign a paper acknowledging that they had a large project and I was aware of it. I signed it but added my own wording acknowledging the project and also the fact that it was THEIRS and not mine. The teacher didn’t like that but I strongly felt that the learning was theirs.

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