Art Together Samples Available

art together color logo_cropped

Just a quick post to say I’ve added some samples from previous issues of Art Together, available as PDF downloads. They’re all listed on the main Art Together page as well as in the individual pages’ contents listings. If you’ve been wondering what the zine has to offer in terms of tone, content, and information, hopefully this will help! And as always, email me at amyhood at amyhoodarts dot com with any questions.

The available PDFs are:

The Color Wheel from Issue One: Color
Drawing With Tape from Issue Two: Line
Artist Spotlight: Hokusai from Issue Three: Printmaking
Scratch Foam Prints from Issue Three: Printmaking

First Steps in Free-Motion Quilting

I decided I wanted to experiment with free-motion quilting. I want to draw with my sewing machine. This makes sense as a continuation of using embroidery as a line medium. It’s different, but related. Anyway, Sarah recommended this book.

book photo

So I borrowed it from the library. Right away I realized I didn’t have the right foot for my sewing machine, but my local quilting store had a darning foot that had been part of a trade-in, and the owner just…let me have it. It goes onto the machine completely differently from any of the other feet I’ve used, but my manual had directions. Once that was on, I followed the directions in the book for making first stitches on a practice pad.

free-motion quilting practice at amyhoodarts.com

I didn’t do too badly with the back and forth lines, but when I got to the swirls, some of those stitches were really uneven.

varying stitch lengths

Yikes–some really long ones in there! This is the point of practice, of course. Now check out the back of the practice pad.

Bobbin snot. It's a problem.

Bobbin snot. It’s a problem.

Whoa. But isn’t it interesting that it’s only in one direction? No bobbin snarls when I was pulling the fabric towards me, just when I was pushing it away. Hmm. I went to the trouble-shooting section of the book and tried the easiest-sounding solution first–I raised the feed dogs back up. And this is what happened:

better back2

 

The first lines have some loops on the back. Again, checking the book, I adjusted the needle tension and then continued on. Much better! That seemed to fix things.

I wanted to share all this because learning something new requires practice and trial and error, and I wanted to show these first wobbly steps. What I want to be able to do and what I can do at this moment are very far apart indeed, but the only way to get from one to the other is to keep practicing.

I’m linking up with Jen for Making + Listening, even though I didn’t title it that way. As for the listening part, it’s been all Phil and Paul and the Tour this week–one of my favorite times of the year.

Drawing Practice

There’s no big mystery to drawing. It’s simply looking very closely with a pen or pencil in hand. Last week, Lori of Camp Creek Blog emailed out daily drawing prompts, but I saved them until this week when I could focus a little more. Many of the prompts are for items I’ve already drawn on my own or through one class or another, but sometimes it’s easier to just go draw what you’re told instead of looking around for something on your own. So I’m trying to, this week.

Day one was hands–first through blind contour, then contour.

Blind contour drawing of my left hand.

Blind contour drawing of my left hand.

Contour drawing of my left hand.

Contour drawing of my left hand.

The second prompt was to draw something from nature. I chose some skate egg cases.

Skate egg case drawing.

Skate egg case drawing.

And day three was to draw something from the kitchen. I chose a pair of tongs. I had some trouble with the rounded, toothed scoop part, especially on the left.

Kitchen tongs.

Kitchen tongs.

That’s the angle I drew it at, so that’s the angle I photographed it at.

I like drawing, and more drawing leads to better drawing, so I plan to finish out the week’s worth of prompts this week. So far none of the kids have sat down to draw next to me (this week), but after observing me drawing the tongs, my daughter went into her room with her sketchbook and drew her Hello Kitty jewelry box. All the kids already draw, though, some more often than others, from imagination and from observation.

Postcard Idea: Color Collage

color theme postcards copy

This week, in support of the Summer Mail Art Swap, we’re sharing the simple idea of making a color collage postcard. The first thing to do is choose a couple of main colors to focus on and gather materials. We have a cigar box of small paper scraps and an expanding file folder of larger scraps and collage papers that are more or less sorted by color. That makes gathering colored papers easier.

I chose red and yellow, so I looked through our papers and chose some I liked. I used a 4×6″ piece of prepared cereal box as my substrate.

Go ahead and gather more paper than you'll need. It's good to have choices as you work.

Go ahead and gather more paper than you’ll need. It’s good to have choices as you work.

My son chose orange and green, and my daughter chose blue and pink. Each selected the papers they wanted to use and arranged them–without gluing–onto their postcard until they were happy. I glued some things down while still arranging. Work in whatever way suits you. We glued our pieces down using gel medium and an old paintbrush. I brushed a final coat of gel medium over all my pieces to seal them down. Make sure all the edges are secure so nothing gets caught in the mail sorting machinery.

color theme postcards

My daughter’s blue and pink postcard is on the top left, my yellow and red one is on the top right, and my son’s green and orange one is on the bottom. This is also a fun way to experiment with different and perhaps unusual color combinations.

There’s still plenty of time to join in with the mail art swap. All the details are here.

Other posts in this series:
Postcard Substrates: What to Use
Postcard Idea: Found Poetry
Postcard Q + A

Postcard Q + A

{Claudine is giving away a copy of Art Together: Issue Four–you have one more day to enter!}

In support of The Summer Mail Art Swap, this week I’m answering some questions I’ve heard. Let’s go!

Is my two-year-old too young to participate?

Nope! Everybody’s art is welcome.

My 5yo daughter wanted to photograph this letter before sending it to her penpal.

My 5yo daughter wanted to photograph this letter before sending it to her penpal.

Suppose my child doesn’t want to mail his or her artwork away?

We deal with this as well. My daughter is very comfortable with giving away her drawings and creations, but my boys, not so much. Sometimes we’ve made one to keep and one to send. We’ve taken pictures before sending letters or artwork along. You could make color photocopies or scan in original artwork. But ultimately, some kids just aren’t ready or willing to give away something they created, and I’ve never insisted.

How will I know you received our postcards?

I’ll send you an email when I receive your envelope. If you mailed them out but haven’t heard from me by July 31, let me know they’re on their way. I’ll wait.

Isn’t it risky to just put the postcards in the mail without an envelope?

It can be. It depends upon what medium is used. Acrylics won’t bleed once they’re dry. Watercolors and water-based printmaking ink will. I usually just drop them in the mail and cross my fingers, figuring that the postal service tries not to let the mail get wet, and if it did, being in an envelope probably wouldn’t save a water-based art piece from running. But there are some things you can do.

First, make sure any glued-down pieces are thoroughly glued down, so no loose edges catch on anything and tear. You can seal the entire postcard with gel medium to help with loose bits and to protect it a bit. One participant wrote in to say they sealed their watercolor postcards with clear packing tape and their pastel postcards by brushing on a layer of lightly watered down school glue. These are great ideas using items you probably already have in the house.

Any other questions? Leave a comment! And there’s still plenty of time to participate. All the details are right here. Also check out Postcard Substrates: What to Use and Postcard Idea: Found Poetry.

Summering

We got back to the beach last week.

At the salt pond behind the barrier beach.

At the salt pond behind the barrier beach.

Last summer I didn’t take my kids to the beach at all. If you know me you know how strange this is; I was working on some other things last summer, mainly, getting myself back on track from PTSD. (This post has more information if you’re new here and curious.) It’s now been about 13 months since I began a low daily dose of Zoloft and, to be succinct, I am grateful a medicine choice exists that I can take and that works for me without side-effects. Zoloft doesn’t change who I am; it allows me to be who I am. Part of that is the mom who packs up the kids and a lunch and towels and sunscreen and toys and books and heads to the beach for six hours. Last summer, even though I knew I’d done that for years, I couldn’t quite fathom how. It all sounded exhausting and too much, just too much.

It’s nice to be back.

Spider crab

Spider crab

The pond was full of spider crabs last week. We never know what we might see there, but it’s always interesting. The pond is shallow (no more than about 4.5 feet throughout) and calm and warmer than the ocean, especially at this time of year. The kids can paddle, and we can get close up with the critters that live there. It’s a different experience from the beach-beach, and we like to mix it up and do some of both each summer.

Last weekend we headed to Beavertail State Park for some tidepooling.

Tidepooling

Tidepooling

We mostly saw very tiny invasive crabs–Asian Shore Crabs–and periwinkles. Beavertail is a beautiful place, with lots of rocks for scampering over.

Beavertail State Park, Jamestown, RI.

Beavertail State Park, Jamestown, RI.

Being near and in salt water is a very happy thing for me. Spending much of last summer sitting on my deck with a book while my kids happily played in the yard (they didn’t have a bad summer, trust me) was the right thing to do. But I’m glad we’re back to spending more time in the sea and sun.

Making + Listening::13/2014

This week I finished 13 zip pockets, to add to the pile to take to a craft fair later this month.

stack of finished pockets

It’s so satisfying to finally get to the point of turning them right-side out and seeing them complete.

stamped + embroidered zip pouches at amyhoodarts.com

Some nautical-themed pouches and two more trees.

I like to have a mix of stamped and embroidered, and I like to change up the colors.

embroidered pouches at amyhoodarts.com

Chickens! Flowers!

And it’s nice to have some varied sizes.

stamped and embroidered pouches at amyhoodarts.com

Once the fair is over I’ll update the Etsy shop and pay it a bit more attention. Dust off the shelves and whatnot.

As for listening…birds, World Cup, Pandora, and my kids. How’s your week been going?

Postcard Idea: Found Poetry

Postcard Idea: Found Poetry at amyhoodarts.com

Suppose you want to participate in the summer postcard swap but you’re not sure what to do artistically? You could do something with words instead–such as found poetry.

To do this, first we looked through magazines, newspapers, and old books (the ones we have set aside for collage purposes) for interesting phrases that we liked. This is obviously easier for kids who can read, but my 5yo really wanted to join in, so I read phrases aloud to her and she cut out ones that she liked. But otherwise, let kids choose phrases they like themselves, with no in-between.

found poetry postcard at amyhoodarts.com

Background: Liquid watercolors.

When we had phrases, we created the backgrounds. These can be as simple or complex as you’d like. Most of the ones here just use watercolors.

found poetry postcard at amyhoodarts.com

Background: Ink doodles colored in with colored pencils.

I like to collect the phrases first and then arrange something from what I have, but my 12yo looked for phrases for a specific idea. There are no hard and fast rules here. The fun is in combining words that you didn’t find together to begin with.

found poetry postcard at amyhoodarts.com

Background: Watercolor, with Sharpie pictures added after words were glued down.

My 5yo had me read all her cut-out phrases to her and then she arranged them according to some internal 5yo order. It came out sounding a bit like the Giant’s story in The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales–which is also a pretty fun outcome.

We used a glue stick to adhere our words to our postcards. The ones with watercolor backgrounds are on watercolor paper, and the one with a colored pencil background is on Bristol board. You could do this on a solid color background, too…use whatever is on hand.

Have you started working on postcards yet? Share your thoughts/ideas in the comments, or add photos in progress to the Art Together Flickr group. And don’t forget to spread the word about the swap–the more the merrier!

Paint Lab #8: The Golden Ratio

I’m continuing with my out-of-order Paint Lab exercises (first post on this project is here). Lab #8 is inspired by the Fibonacci sequence. Fibonacci was a pretty cool guy. Earlier this year my kids and I read about him in Blockhead: The Life of Fibonacci, after encountering him in the first Story of Science book by Joy Hakim. I already knew of the Fibonacci sequence, but I learned more about the man and his other contributions.

Anyway. This exercise has you use examples of the sequence, graphically displayed. I did these in my sketchbook. I printed the images out, rubbed the back of the paper with a graphite stick, then traced the image on the front to transfer the lines. Yep, it took some time. (But, making my own carbon paper in that way always makes me feel a wee bit clever.)

Paint Lab #8 at amyhoodarts.com

For this first one, I used watercolor pencils, wetting the tips before touching them to the paper. This is not hard stuff here–but it was pretty calming. Like a grown-up coloring book.

Paint Lab #8 at amyhoodarts.com

For the second one I used watercolors, going for mostly an earthy palette. I mixed some brown into my blues and greens.

The Golden Ratio as it’s related to art is an interesting thing to Google–so much information, so many examples! Do it if you have some time.

Making + Listening::12/2014

I’m joining in with Jen this week to share a hat I sewed up Tuesday night, using this pattern.

Denim sun hat at amyhoodarts.com

My husband hunted around in his closet when he heard I was looking for denim for this and found a too-big pair of jeans with a rip in the knee. I wasted no time in cutting out the pattern pieces. The hat, by the way, is reversible. Presto-chango.

reversible sun hat at amyhoodarts.com

The cotton fabric is from stash. I bought it because I liked it and as soon as I saw the hat pattern I knew what I’d bought it for.

By the way, I think this is the first time I’ve posted a picture anywhere since my hair was cut in April. I wanted it about collar-bone length and neatened, and after almost three months’ of growing time, it’s still this short. (With layers! That I didn’t ask for!) But I’m okay with it now. It just had to grow for a couple of months first.

I’ll be making more of these hats, I’m pretty sure. I went to the local thrift store Wednesday morning and bought a large pair of jeans for $5. I had a twinge of guilt for planning to cut into perfectly good jeans, but I figure at least the money goes to the attached food pantry.

As for listening, I’ve been enjoying streaming Pandora through my cell phone and playing it via Bluetooth in the car. As I told my kids yesterday, when I was a kid, our family car didn’t even have a cassette player. It was radio or nothing.

“Did you have Internet?”

“Nope.”

“Wow. You’re that old?”